Dr. Larissa Rodriguez Wins Victor A. Politano Award from American Urological Association

Dr. Larissa V. Rodriguez, chair of the Department of Urology and the James J. Colt Professor of Urology at Weill Cornell Medicine and urologist-in-chief at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, was named winner of the 2024 Victor A. Politano Award by the American Urological Association.  The award is presented annually to an individual for outstanding achievements in the field of urinary incontinence. Dr. Rodriguez is being honored for her work to advance the treatment of urinary incontinence through pioneering research and compassionate patient care. She will be recognized at the association’s annual meeting in San Antonio, Texas in May. Read more.

Source: Weill Cornell Medicine, February 8, 2024

Understanding the Link Between Urinary Incontinence in Women and Disability Risk: Insights from Recent Medical Research

Urinary incontinence, a condition that affects millions of women worldwide, may have more severe implications than previously thought. A recent study from the Rush University Medical Center has added a new dimension to our understanding of this common health issue. According to the study, urinary incontinence in women is linked with a higher risk of disability. This finding is significant and has implications for both the management and treatment of urinary incontinence in women. Read more.

Source: Medriva, January 12, 2024

medical research

Urology in the Lab: Researchers link EBV to Multiple Sclerosis

Urology in the Lab starts off with data from a study that very strongly implicates Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as the causative agent underlying multiple sclerosis (MS), a demyelinating disease that often finds its way into the urology clinic due to neurogenic bladder that can develop during the course of disease. Read more.

Urology Times, November 27, 2023

Higher Rate of Bladder Neck Incompetence in Mixed Urinary Incontinence

Patients with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) have a higher rate of bladder neck incompetence (BNI), according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the World Journal of Urology.  Yu-Chen Chen, from the Kaohsiung Medical University in Taiwan, and colleagues conducted a retrospective analysis involving 184 patients with stress UI (SUI), MUI, urge UI (UUI), or dry overactive bladder (OAB) who underwent transrectal ultrasound between 2017 and 2022. In all included patients, the presence of BNI and urethral incompetence was recorded. Read more.

Source: Medical Xpress, November 1, 2023

pregnancy woman childbirth

A Muscle-Regenerating Gel Aims to Treat Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions

In vaginal childbirth, the pelvic muscles are subjected to tremendous stretching and can suffer damage, e.g., tears. These injuries can lead to pelvic floor disorders such as pelvic organ prolapse and urinary and fecal incontinence. The most common treatment option is rehabilitation, although in acute cases surgery may be necessary. However, the damaged fibers do not recover, says Pamela Duran, a bioengineer at the University of California. She and her team have created a hydrogel based on an extracellular matrix extracted from pigs, which has succeeded in regenerating the affected tissue. The results of the research, which was conducted in rats, were recently published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Read more.

Source: El Pais, October 30, 2023

Hydrogel-based Sensor Improves Outlook For People With Overactive Bladder

Overactive bladder syndrome (OBS) causes a frequent, uncontrolled urge to urinate, which can interfere with a person’s daily activities and affect their mental health. A new hydrogel-based device has been developed that can continuously monitor overactive bladders and has the potential to improve the treatment of the condition. Read more.

Source: New Atlas, March 13, 2023

e. coli bacteria

Bladder-on-a-Chip and Bladder Organoids Reveal Dynamics of UTIs

Researchers at the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland developed two complementary benchtop bladder models that could help in understanding the mechanisms behind recurring urinary tract infections (UTIs). The first involves bladder organoids, which allow the researchers to study bacterial-bladder cell interactions under realistic conditions, which include the 3D multi-layered architecture of the bladder wall. The second is a bladder-on-a-chip, which includes additional features that mimic the bladder environment, including the mechanical effects of bladder filling and voiding and bladder vasculature. Read more.

Source: Medgadget, August 3, 2021