Learning to Live with Bladder and Bowel Incontinence

My Story – Submitted by: Shawn

Hello all! My name is Shawn and I am 39 years old and I am bowel and bladder incontinent. This started for me about 2 years ago. Well, l started out driving dump trucks for months and theses guys were dropping 2-3 thousand pound rocks into my truck. Jarred the snot out of me and knocked the wind right out of me several times. I started having issues with balance, feeling lightheaded all the time, blood pressure issues, couldn’t think or reason. And then one day I was sitting in bed talking to my wife, and wammo! I was wet. Soaked! Started having issues during the day peeing my pants and started wetting at night.Continue reading

Life is More

My Story – Submitted by: Gary

My story is simple yet it has its moments. I did not have any incontinence difficulties until I injured my back at work 4 times in 1 year. The doctor said it was nothing major after looking at the x-rays and sent me on my way, workmans comp covered the cost since I was hurt at work. These injuries occurred several months apart. I cannot say exactly when it all started but I woke up one morning with a slightly wet bed. I attributed it to excessive night sweating and forgot about it. Continue reading

Happiness for Man with Underdeveloped Bladder

My Story – Submitted by: Charles

My name is Charles. I wear diapers 24/7 because I was born 3 and a half months early. I am getting married Saturday, September 26, 2009 to a nice young lady. She accepts my problem. She even helps me change, no matter where we are.Continue reading

Growing Up With a “Quirky Bladder” Caused by Benign Tumor

My Story – Submitted by: Michael

I grew up with what my family, friends and I thought was simply a quirky bladder. I had difficulty with toilet training and, due to frequent bed wetting incidents and daytime accidents, wore training pants and plastic pants through first grade. Although I learned to conceal my problem, several years ago it became bad enough that “a quirky bladder” was no longer an acceptable description. Continue reading

Gallbladder, Kidney Stones, and Incontinence

My Story – Submitted by: Anonymous

I’ve always had some bedwetting problems, but in the last few years they have become worse due to the fact that I have passed several kidney stones over the years, and it has affected my kidneys, and caused me to wet the bed more than usual. I have tried several different things, and none of them seem to have any affect on the bedwetting problem. Continue reading

Anxiety: Facing Surgery and Rehabilitation

My Story – Submitted by: Anonymous

I am a 63 year old male with incontinence, due to damage to my bladder nerve, and I also have enlarged prostate leakage. I wet in my sleep, due to my nerve damage and leak a little when awake, due to prostate enlargement.Continue reading

Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI)

weak strong pelvic muscles

Weak pelvic muscles can allow urine to leak out causing stress urinary incontinence.

Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is the most common type of incontinence. The “stress” in this incontinence refers to a physical stress that’s placed on the urinary system, such as a cough, sneeze, or laugh. About 50% of women occasionally experience SUI. While women experience stress incontinence more often then men, some men do experience it as well.Continue reading

Functional Incontinence

bathroom functional incontinence

Keeping a bathroom free of trip hazards will help a person with functional incontinence.

Functional incontinence is urinary or fecal leakage that occurs when the urinary or fecal body systems, respectively, are physiologically working fine. Functional incontinence is the result of mobility challenges with getting to the bathroom and/or dexterity challenges with removing clothing in a reasonable amount of time.Continue reading

Sacral Nerve Stimulation for Incontinence

sacral nerve stimulation

Sacral nerve stimulation involves the placement of an implant to stimulate the sacral nerve.

Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS), also called sacral neuromodulation, involves surgical implantation of a device that sends a low-voltage electrical current to the sacral nerve. The sacral nerve is located at the base of the spine that affects the bladder, bowel, and pelvic floor. The implant stimulates the sacral nerve and to alleviate fecal and/or urinary incontinence.  A hand-held device is used to stop the contraction of your sphincter muscles when you need to empty your bowels.Continue reading