product approval introduction

Signal Catheter Prevents Injury from Premature Balloon Inflation

Safe Medical Design, a company based in San Francisco, CA, won FDA clearance for its Signal Catheter device. The indwelling foley urinary catheter is designed to help prevent discomfort and injury that can occur if it’s incorrectly placed, an all-too-common occurrence. Indwelling urinary catheters typically have a balloon at the tip that is inflated once it’s within the bladder. This prevents the catheter from sliding out. When the patient is “dry” and no urine is in the catheter, it’s often difficult to tell whether the catheter tip made it into the bladder, at times resulting in premature inflation that can cause serious trauma. The Signal Catheter is made of 100% silicone and it features a mechanism that relieves the pressure inside the balloon if it is improperly positioned and inflated inside the urethra. Read more.

Source: Medgadget, March 1, 2019

autonomic nerves

Prevalence of Urological Complications Among People Who Have Type 1 Diabetes

Major complications of type 1 diabetes include retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease. Other complications that are less studied are urological conditions. Urological complications can be severe for people who have type 1 diabetes.  Some complications include sexual dysfunction, urinary tract infections, lower urinary tract symptoms, and urinary incontinence. Quality of life is a major concern with urological conditions and can negatively affect a person’s health. In addition, these issues are associated with higher A1C levels. The Urologic Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (UroEDIC) was established to study these complications. Read more.

Source: Diabetes in Control, December 22, 2018

business buildings

Triple W Launches DFree, First Wearable Device for Incontinence

Triple W, an innovator of connected health devices, today announced the U.S. launch of DFree®, the first wearable device for incontinence that notifies the user when it’s time to go to the bathroom. With DFree, seniors, children and disabled people with – bladder control issues have a convenient and cost-effective alternative to disposable diapers or pads and medications. DFree gives them freedom to live an active lifestyle with peace of mind from accidents. DFree has been used in over 500 senior care facilities in Japan and Europe since 2017. Triple W will showcase its new DFree device for consumer use at Medtrade, Georgia World Congress Center (Booth 2252), Oct. 16-17. Read more.

Source: PRWeb, October 16, 2018

Intractable Urinary Incontinence Despite Treatments and Surgeries

My Story – Submitted by: Marguerite

I have suffered from intractable urinary incontinence for 20 years with many treatments and no success.   I have undergone the so-called gold standard Burch Procedure surgery during which time I acquired Clostridium difficile in the hospital.  I have had vaginal mesh surgery. I have  tried Medtronic’s Interstim implant in my buttocks to stimulate my sacral nerve (which later was removed as no longer functioning) and have had several infusions of botox in my bladder. I have had cocktails injected to treat (non existent) interstitial cystitis and now I rely on self-catheterization to Continue reading

depression elderly nursing home

Loss of Control: Exploring the Links Between Falls and Incontinence

It might seem odd to some that resident falls and incontinence would be mentioned in the same breath. It actually can be difficult to estimate the extent to which one causes the other.  Yet, as clinical detectives have discovered, both subjects have a way of winding up in the same discussions. It all relates to the dangers for those residents who have lost control of their bodies in one or more ways. Emerging research and technology are growing closer to uncovering major underlying issues that could lead to reductions of incontinence and falls. As a result, they’re instilling hope for a better quality of life for millions of seniors. Read more.

Source: McKnight’s Long-Term Care News, March  8, 2018

catheter coating research

Incontinence Affects More Than 200m People Worldwide, So Why Isn’t More Being Done to Find a Cure?

For a chronic health condition that causes shame and misery for countless people and costs billions, urinary incontinence keeps a low profile.  Media reports about chronic health conditions appear with alarming regularity, but it is rare to read about the debilitating impact of the involuntary leakage of urine. Nevertheless, urinary incontinence is a condition which, next to Alzheimer’s or strokes, is reported as most negatively affecting “health-related quality of life”.  The reasons for this are not too hard to fathom. Urinary incontinence, of course, elicits some embarrassment. And there also seems to be a feeling this is a low priority condition: urinary incontinence does not directly bear up against the terrible impacts of life threatening conditions and illnesses. Read more.

Source: The Conversation, February 14, 2018

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

Urinary Incontinence: What Pharmacists Should Know

Urinary incontinence (UI), the involuntary leakage of urine, is a frequent and problematic chronic condition for many patients. An estimated 10 to 30% of men and women are affected nationally, though this may be underestimated due to underdiagnoses and undertreatment.1-3 Often, patients who suffer with UI symptoms will develop poor self-rated health, depression, and mobility disability.4,5 This comorbid disease state also presents a substantial financial burden; data from 2014 found that in the United States alone, an estimated $65.9 billion in direct and indirect costs were spent for UI treatment.3  Read more.

Source: Drug Topics, January 23, 2018

meeting conference

Report from NIA-Sponsored Conference Asks: What Don’t We Know About Bladder Control?

Nearly 40 percent of older women and up to 35 percent of older men live with distressing urinary symptoms, including difficulty with bladder control and urinating (sometimes known as “voiding”), which often compromise quality of life and overall health. The lack of truly effective and safe therapies for these challenges stems from insufficient knowledge of the biological mechanisms for urinary control, the impact of aging and disease on urinary control, and the relationships of symptoms to urinary health and overall well-being, so say researchers reporting on a prestigious conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and funded by a grant from the National Institute of Aging (NIA) to George A. Kuchel, MD, FRCP, AGSF, Director of the UConn Center on Aging and Travelers Chair in Geriatrics and Gerontology at UConn Health.  Read more. 

Source: Medical Xpress, December 4, 2017

woman India

Friends Adult Diapers Flags Off Its First Ad Campaign

With the campaign, Friends Adults Diapers aims is to blow the lid off the issue and show how liberating life can be again for a senior who is homebound due to incontinence.  Adult Incontinence is considered a taboo across in India, it is brushed away under the carpet and ignored like it doesn’t exist. The brand has launched the country’s first ever campaign for the category, bringing the spotlight on the subject, in a unique light-hearted manner that’s bound to resonate with people across the country.  With the campaign, Friends Adults Diapers aims is to blow the lid off the issue and show how liberating life can be again for a senior who is homebound due to incontinence; how one product can bring about a life-altering change in the lives of our elders and how accepting the problem and its solution can leave the senior citizens with happiness and freedom in the last leg of their lives.  Read more.

Source: ETBrandEquity.com, November 24, 2017

improve incontinence

New Report Indicates No Evidence AHT Pelvic Exercise Works

Abdominal hypopressive technique (AHT), an exercise method widely touted for 20 years as a way of controlling bladder leakage and pelvic organ prolapse, doesn’t work, according to a new report.  AHT is a breathing exercise developed in the 1980s by Belgian physiotherapist Marcel Caufriez. Highly popular, it is taught by more than 1500 practitioners in 14 countries, including in Australia.  But a report published last week in the British Journal of Sports Medicine finds no scientific evidence to support the claimed benefits of AHT.  Authors Kari Bo, of the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, in Oslo, and Saul Martín-Rodríguez, of the College of Physical Education, in Las Palmas, Spain, acknowledge the “worldwide huge interest” in AHT but say it “lacks scientific evidence to support its benefits. At this stage, AHT is based on a theory with 20 years of clinical practice.” Read more.

Source: Cosmos Magazine, October 18, 2017