women friends

Women Have Many Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence

Roughly half of adult women may experience urinary incontinence, but few of them get diagnosed and treated despite a wide range of options to address the problem, doctors say.  Women are particularly prone to stress urinary incontinence, when the pelvic floor muscles are too weak to support the bladder. As a result, urine leaks during coughing, sneezing or exercise. Childbirth is a common reason for weak pelvic muscles, and obesity worsens the problem. Urge incontinence, in contrast, doesn’t have a clear cause, although it can sometimes happen due to neurological problems, the authors note. Some women may get both types of incontinence at once or develop bladder problems due to a urinary tract infection. Read more.

Source: Reuters, October 24, 2017

Florence Italy ICS 2017

GTx Announces Positive Results from Enobosarm Phase 2 Clinical Trial

GTx, Inc. (Nasdaq: GTXI) today announced top-line clinical trial results demonstrating that a daily dose of enobosarm 3 mg (GTx-024) substantially improved stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women, as well as related quality of life measurements. In this open-label clinical trial, all 17 patients completing 12 weeks of treatment saw a clinically significant reduction (50 percent or greater) in stress leaks per day, compared to baseline. Mean stress leaks decreased by 83 percent from baseline over 12 weeks, and the reductions in daily stress leaks following completion of treatment have been sustained as patients are being followed for up to 7 months post-treatment to assess the durability of treatment effect. No patient has relapsed to her baseline levels. These results were presented at the International Continence Society (ICS) Annual Meeting currently being held in Florence, Italy from September 12-15, 2017. Read more.

Source: Business Wire, September 13, 2017

business buildings

State-backed Fund Boosts Monroe Company’s Elitone Medical Device

A Connecticut venture fund is backing a Monroe startup that is seeking Food and Drug Administration approval of a device to help alleviate a urological disorder affecting millions of women.  In April, Newtown residents Gloria and Eric Kolb won U.S. patent protection on Monroe-based Elidah’s Elitone device to help women with stress urinary incontinence, with the Elitone device emitting mild electric impulses to stimulate and strengthen pelvic muscles.  Women diagnosed with the condition can suffer urinary leakage during physical exertion or while coughing or sneezing. To date, physicians have recommended solutions ranging from exercises to surgical implants called pelvic meshes, with thousands of lawsuits having been filed against three manufacturers of the devices the past few years after women suffered adverse reactions.  Read more.

Source: ctpost, August 17, 2017

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

GTx Announces Preliminary Results with Enobosarm

GTx, Inc. (Nasdaq: GTXI) today announced release of preliminary clinical data from its ongoing, open-label, Phase 2 clinical trial of enobosarm 3 mg (GTx-024) in postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). An abstract entitled “Kegels In A Bottle”: Preliminary Results Of A Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator (GTx-024) For The Treatment Of SUI In Post-Menopausal Women, summarizing clinical data from the first seven patients completing 12 weeks of treatment with enobosarm, is now available on the International Continence Society’s website. This proof-of-concept clinical trial is the first of its kind to evaluate an orally-administered selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) for SUI. Read more.

Source: BusinessWire, June 12, 2017

women friends

Low Estrogen May Contribute to Incontinence in Women

Significantly lower levels of oestrogen in peri-menopausal and post-menopausal women could increase their risk of stress urinary incontinence, according to Austrian researchers.  They noted that sex steroid levels changed markedly during menopause, and oestrogen deficiency after menopause caused changes within the urogenital tract.  Their study included 47 women with stress urinary incontinence who were matched with 47 controls.  The findings suggested that low levels of circulating sex steroids might have a negative impact on the function of the lower urinary tract and on mechanisms involved with continence.  Read more.

Nursing Times, June 8, 2017

DNA genetics

New Genomic Analysis Promises Benefit in Female Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence in women is common, with almost 50% of adult women experiencing leakage at least occasionally. Genetic or heritable factors are known to contribute to half of all cases, but until now studies had failed to identify the genetic variants associated with the condition. Speaking at the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today (Monday), Dr Rufus Cartwright, MD, a visiting researcher in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College, London, UK, will say that his team’s investigations hold out the promise that drugs already used for the treatment of other conditions can help affected women combat this distressing problem. Read more.

Source: Medical Xpress, May 29, 2017

women friends

AUA & SUFU Release Guideline on Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence

With nearly 50 percent of women in the United States experiencing symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the American Urological Association (AUA), a leading global urology association and the Society of Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine and Urogenital Reconstruction (SUFU), the premier urological subspecialty society dedicated to improving the art and science of female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery, recently released a joint evidence-based clinical guideline on the surgical treatment of SUI in women.  SUI is defined as the involuntary leakage of urine due to increased abdominal pressure, which can be caused by such activities as physical exercise, sneezing, laughing or coughing. Approximately half of all women experience SUI symptoms during their lifetime, and many of these women are sufficiently bothered by their symptoms to seek treatment from a physician. Pelvic floor muscle exercises and other nonsurgical treatments can be effective therapies, but many women choose to undergo surgery to treat their SUI symptoms. Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, April 18, 2017

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Strong Muscles Tied to Lower Risk of Incontinence in Older Women

Women who have more lean muscle mass or better grip strength may be less likely to experience a common type of urinary incontinence, a study suggests.  That’s because strong muscles may help counter what’s known as stress urinary incontinence, which happens when the pelvic floor muscles supporting the bladder are too weak to prevent urine leaks when people do things like cough, sneeze or exercise. Childbirth is a common reason for weak pelvic muscles, and obesity makes the problem worse. Read more.

Source: WHBL, December 15, 2016

hormones change as women age

When Bathroom Runs Rule the Day (and Night)

I have only one regret about not having been born a male, and it concerns plumbing, namely how easy it is for men to eliminate liquid waste,  whether by avoiding long bathroom lines or being able to relieve themselves discreetly when no facility is available.  My male envy grew after I contracted poison ivy on unmentionable parts when nature called during a hike in the woods. Urination has long been a vexing problem for women.  Read more.

Source: New York Times, December 12, 2016

Bacteria

Weethinking the Role of Bacteria in Urinary Incontinence

We all know that feeling of suddenly needing to pee, and the agonizing worry that we might not find a toilet in time or make it that far. Sadly, for many people this is a regular occurrence and wetting themselves uncontrollably is an inevitable consequence.  Almost 1 in 5 women over the age of 44 suffer from what is known as Urgency Urinary Incontinence (UUI): experiencing a strong sensation of an urgent need to pee, followed by immediate leakage of a large volume of urine. It can severely adversely affect someone’s life, contributing to anxiety, depression and social isolation. Read more.

Source: EurekAlerts, October 7, 2016