pregnant woman birth childbirth

Women Who Have Not Given Birth Also Experience Urinary Incontinence, Study Finds

Women who have not given birth often end up under the radar for research on urinary incontinence. In a study of this group, however, one in five women over 45 years say they experience this type of incontinence.  “This confirms that problems are found in all groups, and that women have a weakness of the pelvic floor even if they have not previously given birth,” says Maria Gyhagen, gynecologist at Södra Älvsborg Hospital in Borås and researcher at Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University. Read more.

Source: News-Medical.net, November 9, 2016

female athlete running thriathletes

Female Triathletes at Higher Risk for Pelvic Floor Disorders

Female triathletes are at a higher risk for several health issues, including pelvic floor disorders, new research indicates. Researchers conducted an internet survey of 311 self-identified female triathletes. Results showed a significant prevalence of pelvic floor disorders, with urinary incontinences (37.4 percent) and anal incontinence (28.0 percent) being the most common.  Read more.

Source: Science Daily, August 23, 2016

microbiologist at laboratory work

BioLife Products Embedded in Cook MyoSite Phase 3 Cell Therapy Trial for Stress Urinary Incontinence

BioLife Solutions, Inc.(BioLife, a leading developer, manufacturer and marketer of proprietary clinical grade cell and tissue hypothermic storage and cryopreservation freeze media, announced that its media products are embedded into the autologous cell therapy being developed by Pittsburgh-based Cook MyoSite, a subsidiary of the Cook Group, for treatment of female stress urinary incontinence.  Read more.

Source: PharmaBiz.com, July 19, 2016

Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI)

weak strong pelvic muscles

Weak pelvic muscles can allow urine to leak out causing stress urinary incontinence.

Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is the most common type of incontinence. The “stress” in this incontinence refers to a physical stress that’s placed on the urinary system, such as a cough, sneeze, or laugh. About 50% of women occasionally experience SUI. While women experience stress incontinence more often then men, some men do experience it as well.Continue reading

Mixed Incontinence

doctor and patient

Make sure you discuss your diagnosis with your doctor to rule out mixed incontinence.

In some cases, urinary incontinence can be a combination of both stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and urge incontinence. It is important to realize that if you have mixed incontinence, but only treat one of the two types, you will still have incontinence. In other words, both types of incontinence must be treated to see desirable results.Continue reading

Surgeries for Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI)

sling surgery for stress urinary incontinence

Creating a “sling” is one surgical method for helping alleviate the symptoms of stress urinary incontinence.

Surgeries for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) usually involve creating a small hammock under the bladder neck or mid urethra to help support it. Depending on the specific type of surgery, the hammock can be constructed of tissue taken from another area of your own body, or a synthetic material. When your sphincter muscle clamps down on the urethra, it presses against this new “hammock” which provides resistance and clamps the urethra closed, helping to keep urine in.Continue reading

Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercises

pelvic floor muscle exercises will help strengthen the male pelvic floor muscles

This is a diagram of the male pelvic floor.  Men and women can both do pelvic floor muscle exercises to help strengthening the muscles located in their pelvic floors to help control urine leakage.

Pelvic floor muscle exercises make the pelvic floor muscles stronger.  Strengthening these muscles may help you have more control over leaking urine during times of physical stress, such as laughing, coughing, or sneezing.  These exercises are often referred to as Kegel exercises.

Everyone has a pelvic floor. The pelvic floor is a group of muscles that form a hammock shape in your pelvis.  Pelvic floor muscles hold up the pelvic organs and keep them in the right place. In women these organs are the uterus, bowel and bladder. In men the same muscles hold the bowel and bladder. The muscles of the pelvic floor can become weak and can start to sag. This can happen because of injuries, pregnancy, childbirth, or surgery (including prostate surgery and hysterectomies). The muscles can also become weaker from carrying extra weight, or from chronic coughingContinue reading

Electric Stimulation of the Pelvic Floor Muscles

During electric stimulation (or e-stim for short), sticky pads are stuck to the skin around the vagina or a little piece of plastic is placed into the vagina or rectum. A very small amount of electricity goes into this pad or piece of plastic and makes the muscles move and contract.  These contractions are exercises for the pelvic floor muscles. With these exercises, the pelvic floor muscles can get stronger — just like an arm muscle that gets regular exercise. E-stim is usually started by a doctor, nurse practitioner, nurse or physical therapist. He or she will work with you one or more times per week for several weeks.  Practitioners usually incorporate biofeedback at the same time as the e-stim, but not always.Continue reading

Bulking Agents to Restore Urinary Continence

collagen used a bulking agent

Collagen is one of several bulking agents that may used to help restore continence.

Injections of one of several kinds of bulking agents is an outpatient procedure that may be used to restore urinary continence.  In this procedure a bulking agent (such as collagen, silicon and Teflon) is injected into the neck of the bladder.  This bulks the bladder neck and helps compress the urethra (the tube that leads urine out of the body), and thus helps to prevent urinary leakage.

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