exercise women

ICS 2018: Atlantic Therapeutics Exhibit New Data Demonstrating Comparable Efficacy, Increased Tolerability and Reduced Infection Risk of its Non-invasive Device Innovo® in Treating Stress Urinary Incontinence

Atlantic Therapeutics, a global manufacturer of innovative, garment-based pelvic floor muscle strengthening and nerve stimulation products, exhibits data highlighting comparable safety and efficacy of its INNOVO® therapy, an externally worn electrical muscle stimulation device for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence, with greatly reduced risk of infection and improved user tolerability over existing intravaginal probe devices1.  Presented as a poster at the 48th Annual Meeting of the International Continence Society, the data was the result of an FDA designed clinical trial, with patients whose condition had not improved using pelvic floor muscle training. Supporting Atlantic Therapeutics’ FDA approval via the De Novo route for INNOVO®. Designed for at home use and worn as a close-fitting pair of shorts, INNOVO® was compared with an existing FDA approved intravaginal stimulation product as control. Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, August 28, 2018

PeriCoach from Analytica

Analytica Expands Clinical Indication for Its Unique Pelvic Floor Exercise Technology

Analytica Limited (ASX:ALT) has received clearance from the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration for the expanded clinical indication for its PeriCoach System to assist in the conservative treatment of Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP).  The PeriCoach system with its patent protected force sensing technology assists women to properly perform pelvic floor exercises.  The expanded clinical indication for PeriCoach now includes targeted resolution of symptoms for mild to moderate POP, urinary incontinence and sexual wellness.  Data suggests that 50% of women that have given birth have some degree of POP and half of women over 50 complain of prolapse symptoms. Estimates state women have a lifetime risk of up to 12% of undergoing a surgical intervention, with a re-operation rate of nearly 20%. Read more.

Source: Proactiveinvestors Australia, May 2, 2018

sleep woman nocturia

Nonpharmacologic Therapy Ups Sleep Quality in Women With Nocturia

Both tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) can improve sleep quality in women with nocturia, according to new study findings.  In a randomized trial, 40 women with self-reported nocturia were blindly assigned to transcutaneous electrical TNS or PFMT with behavioral therapy for 30 minutes each week for 3 months. PFMT inhibits detrusor contraction, and TNS eases lower urinary tract symptoms. Women with neurogenic bladder or on antimuscarinic or antidiuretic therapy were among the excluded patients.  Read more.

Source: Renal and Urology News, April 11, 2018

Apple iPhone

BewellConnect’s MyPeriTens Multi-Action Pelvic Floor Trainer

BewellConnect recently unveiled their new pelvic floor muscle trainer to help women with related issues, including post-partum complications and incontinence. The MyPeriTens device is both an electrical nerve stimulator and electrical muscle stimulator that is controlled through a smartphone app, allowing women to have precise control over the intensity and nature of the electrical signals delivered.  The smartphone app has a number of routines built in that the woman can perform on her own, or with assistance of a physical therapist. Each routine can be selected to run at the patient’s preferred intensity level, maximizing benefits while keeping any pain and discomfort at a minimum.  Read more.

Source: Medgadget, February 15, 2018

exercise women

A Revolutionary Design in Pelvic Floor Weakness Treatment

It’s more common than hay fever, yet women just don’t talk about pelvic floor weakness, a condition resulting in intermittent urinary leakage. It affects one in three women in varying degrees of severity — 82% consider their symptoms severe, while 70% wear absorbent pads to deal with it. Yet, 68% of women never seek medical help. “Women are embarrassed. It’s called stress urinary incontinence and they associate the word ‘incontinence’ with old ladies being wet all the time,” says Dr Ruth Maher, an associate professor at the Department of Physical Therapy, Creighton University in Omaha. Maher is one of the original four inventors of recently launched innovotherapy, a non-invasive treatment for pelvic floor weakness. Innovotherapy directly targets pelvic floor weakness — the root cause of urinary leaks — unlike many other treatments which simply mask symptoms. Read more.

Source: The Irish Examiner, April 3, 2017

Apple iPhone

New System Uses Remote Medical Monitoring, Mobile Games to Improve At-Home Pelvic Floor Muscle Training

Urinary incontinence is any involuntary urine leakage. It is a condition that can be more or less severe and it affects one in three women of all ages, which is more than 56 million people in Europe and more than 350 million people in the world. It is not a normal part of ageing and has a negative impact on the quality of life of the women who suffer from it. The main risk factors for urinary incontinence are pregnancy and childbirth, overweight and obesity, and high-impact sports. There are several treatments to improve or cure its symptoms, depending on the type of incontinence, and it can also be prevented by taking measures before it appears.  One approach that has proven effective in preventing and treating stress urinary incontinence is pelvic floor muscle training. It consists of a programme of contraction and relaxation exercises for the muscles that form the base of the pelvis. If the treatment is followed and performed correctly with the supervision of a therapist, the rate of cure/improvement may reach 70% .Read more.

Source: News-Medical.net, March 9, 2017

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What You Need to Know to Put the Brakes on USI

Urinary stress incontinence (USI) affects 25 per cent of women over 40 with the incidence increasing with age. It’s defined as a loss of urine often with cough, sneeze, laughing, running or lifting. Yet despite the prevalence of this condition, many women do not seek help until symptoms become severe and have been ongoing for at least two years.  Factors contributing to USI are childbirth, pregnancy, menopause, low back pain, weight gain and smoking. USI responds well to conservative non-surgical treatment with the first line of treatment often being pelvic floor strengthening exercises under the supervision of a physiotherapist. Physiotherapists often use biofeedback and electrical stimulation to help reeducate these muscles. Read more.

Source: The Chronicle Herald, February 8, 2017

Electric Stimulation of the Pelvic Floor Muscles

During electric stimulation (or e-stim for short), sticky pads are stuck to the skin around the vagina or a little piece of plastic is placed into the vagina or rectum. A very small amount of electricity goes into this pad or piece of plastic and makes the muscles move and contract.  These contractions are exercises for the pelvic floor muscles. With these exercises, the pelvic floor muscles can get stronger — just like an arm muscle that gets regular exercise. E-stim is usually started by a doctor, nurse practitioner, nurse or physical therapist. He or she will work with you one or more times per week for several weeks.  Practitioners usually incorporate biofeedback at the same time as the e-stim, but not always.Continue reading

Biofeedback Therapy for Incontinence

biofeedback is a loop

Biofeedback provides you with immediate information about how well you are performing pelvic floor exercises.

Biofeedback is used to treat many conditions such as headaches, high blood pressure, and incontinence. Biofeedback helps you learn how to control certain functions in the body. You can get information from a computer that translates your body functions into pictures or numbers to help you learn to how to improve your muscle control.Continue reading