pregnancy woman childbirth

A Muscle-Regenerating Gel Aims to Treat Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions

In vaginal childbirth, the pelvic muscles are subjected to tremendous stretching and can suffer damage, e.g., tears. These injuries can lead to pelvic floor disorders such as pelvic organ prolapse and urinary and fecal incontinence. The most common treatment option is rehabilitation, although in acute cases surgery may be necessary. However, the damaged fibers do not recover, says Pamela Duran, a bioengineer at the University of California. She and her team have created a hydrogel based on an extracellular matrix extracted from pigs, which has succeeded in regenerating the affected tissue. The results of the research, which was conducted in rats, were recently published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Read more.

Source: El Pais, October 30, 2023

autonomic nerves

UH Researcher Receives $1.6 Million to Reverse Urinary Incontinence

A University of Houston researcher is working to reverse pelvic floor dysfunction which can result in urinary incontinence, a condition affecting 30-60% of the female population and 5-15% of males. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the most common type of urinary incontinence in women, relates to the unintentional loss of urine which happens during movement or activities like sneezing, coughing or exercising. The condition is associated with pregnancy and aging and affects the pelvic floor, a group of muscles stretching from the pubic bone to the tail bone that contributes to continence. Read more.

Source: News-Medical.Net, October 15, 2020