obese, obesity

Study Highlights Association of Obesity with Fecal Incontinence in Spina Bifida Patients

In the November 2017 issue of Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Dr. Charlène Brochard and her colleagues from a spina bifida referral center in Rennes, France, report on the frequency of intestinal problems in 26- to 45-year-old patients with spina bifida. The multidisciplinary study included clinical data obtained over a 9-year period on nearly 400 spina bifida patients, emphasizing the association of obesity with fecal incontinence and bowel dysfunction.  Read more.

Source: News-Medical. net, October 9, 2017

weight scale measuring tape

Body Composition May Affect Older Women’s Risk of Urinary Incontinence

In a study of older women, the prevalence of stress- and urgency urinary incontinence (SUI and UUI) was at least two-fold higher among women in the highest category of body mass index (BMI) or fat mass compared with women in the lowest category.  Also, women who lost at least 5% of their BMI or fat mass were less likely to experience new or persistent SUI over 3 years than women with less weight loss.  Read more.

Source: EurekAlert, December 6, 2016

Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI)

weak strong pelvic muscles

Weak pelvic muscles can allow urine to leak out causing stress urinary incontinence.

Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is the most common type of incontinence. The “stress” in this incontinence refers to a physical stress that’s placed on the urinary system, such as a cough, sneeze, or laugh. About 50% of women occasionally experience SUI. While women experience stress incontinence more often then men, some men do experience it as well.Continue reading

Obesity and Being Overweight

exercise reduces obesity

Exercising regularly, like walking, can help reduce your risk of becoming obese.

Men, women and children who are obese are at a higher risk of developing urinary incontinence. They also may have other lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).  The extra weight carried around a person’s middle puts undue stress and pressure on to the muscles of the pelvic floor. This leads to the pelvic floor muscles getting weak and sagging. This in turn can lead to accidental leakage of urine.  Obesity (and being overweight) may also lead to Type 2 diabetes, which causes damage to the nerves that control the bladder.Continue reading


autonomic nerves

Over time, diabetes will damage nerves.

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition where your body resists the effects of insulin (or does not produce enough insulin) to maintain a normal glucose level in your body.  Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes, with about 95% of all people with diabetes in the USA having this form.  Type 2 diabetes increases your risk and severity for both urinary and fecal incontinence. Continue reading