drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

Black Patients Less Likely to Fill Prescriptions For Newer, Safer Urinary Incontinence Drugs

Millions of adults take medications to help relieve symptoms of overactive bladder and reduce episodes of urinary incontinence.  But research linking some of those medications called anticholinergic drugs, such as oxybutynin, to memory loss drove recommendations to treat urinary incontinence with beta-3 agonists, drugs that offer the same benefit but without the risk of cognitive decline.  A new study in JAMA Network Open led by Northwestern Medicine and Duke University School of Medicine shows Black patients are less likely to fill prescriptions for newer, safer urinary incontinence drugs compared to white patients, potentially raising their risk for dementia.  Read more.

Source: Duke University School of Medicine, June 12, 2023

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

Study Finds Vibegron Has No Adverse Ambulatory Effects in Patients with OAB

It is important for clinicians to perform ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for patients taking new prescribed medications, as they may affect blood pressure or heart rate in detrimental ways. It is especially important to monitor patients with overactive bladder (OAB), as this group has an increasing abundance of novel medicines available to them.  In a recent study presented at the 2021 American Urological Association Annual Meeting,¹ Michael A. Weber, MD, and co-authors assessed the blood pressure and heart rate profiles of the beta 3 adrenergic receptor agonist vibegron (Gemtesa) in treating patients with OAB. Read more.

Source: Urology Times, November 5 2021

product approval introduction

FDA Approves Myrbetriq Combo Treatment for Overactive Bladder

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Myrbetriq (mirabegron extended-release tablets; Astellas) in combination with the muscarinic antagonist solifenacin succinate for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and urinary frequency. In clinical trials, the combination of Myrbetriq + solifenacin succinate was associated with greater improvements in the number of incontinence episodes per 24 hours (primary endpoint), the number of micturitions per 24 hours (primary endpoint), and the volume voided per micturition (secondary endpoint) compared to placebo or to individual active components. Long-term data also demonstrated that the effects of combination treatment were maintained throughout a 1-year treatment period. Read more.

Source: MPR, April 30, 2018

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

Urovant Starts Pursuit of Astellas’ Overactive Bladder Drug Myrbetriq with New Phase 3 Trial

A little later than expected, Roivant group company Urovant has started its confirmatory phase 3 program for overactive bladder (OAB) drug vibegron, originally licensed from Merck & Co.  The pivotal trial—which was originally expected to get underway last year—will involve around 1,400 adults with symptoms of OAB such as urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and urinary frequency, according to Urovant.  The drug already has positive phase 2b and phase 3 data in hand, so if the latest trial is positive Urovant should be able to move ahead with regulatory filings. If approved, it could become a direct competitor to Astellas’ Myrbetriq (mirabegron), the first beta3-adrenergic agonist to reach the market for OAB. And that could present a big commercial opportunity: Astellas reported sales of its drug rose 30% to 93.1 billion yen ($876 million) in the nine months to end-January 2018 with take-up driven by greater tolerability than the widely used antimuscarinic OAB drug class. Read more.

Source: Fierce Biotech, March 28, 2018

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

U.S. FDA Accepts for Review Astellas sNDA for Mirabegron

Astellas Pharma Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted for review a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) that seeks approval for the use of mirabegron in combination with solifenacin succinate 5 mg for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and urinary frequency. The anticipated Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) goal date for a decision by the FDA is April 28, 2018. In the United States, mirabegron and solifenacin succinate are marketed as Myrbetriq® and VESIcare®, respectively. Each is approved by the FDA as a monotherapy for the treatment of OAB with symptoms of urge urinary continence, urgency and urinary frequency. Read more.

Source: Gurufocus.com, September 12, 2017

business buildings

Astellas Submits Supplemental New Drug Application for Mirabegron

Astellas Pharma Inc. (TSE: 4503, President and CEO: Yoshihiko Hatanaka, “Astellas”) announced today the submission of a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seeking approval for the use of mirabegron in combination with solifenacin succinate 5 mg for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency and urinary frequency. In the United States, mirabegron and solifenacin succinate are marketed as Myrbetriq® and VESIcare®, respectively. Each is approved by the FDA as a monotherapy for the treatment of OAB with symptoms of urge urinary continence, urgency and urinary frequency.  Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, June 29, 2017

Prescription Drugs for Overactive Bladder (OAB)

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

There are several prescription drugs for overactive bladder (OAB).

The FDA approved medications, or drugs, currently available on the U.S. market for the treatment of urinary incontinence are for a specific condition called overactive bladder (OAB). Some are also used for OAB with urge urinary incontinence (UUI). You may have seen advertisements on television or in magazines for these medications. Most of the prescription drugs for OAB partially calm the bladder muscles that cause abnormal contractions, thereby reducing the frequency and severity of the overwhelming urge to urinate. Some of these drugs may also increase the bladder’s capacity to hold urine and delay the initial urge to void. This class of drugs is referred to as antimuscarinics.

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