mother post pregnancy

Postpartum Urinary Incontinence Linked to Mental Health

A UT Southwestern Medical Center study of hundreds of underserved women showed that depression and anxiety, in addition to physical factors such as a higher body mass index and previous births, are associated with lingering postpartum urinary incontinence. The findings, published in Urogynecology, shine a spotlight on these conditions that can carry stigmas but are largely treatable, researchers say. “Our study draws a bridge between two vital components of health care that are often overlooked and neglected: postpartum care and mental health,” said Sonia Bhandari Randhawa, M.D., a second-year Urogynecology fellow at UT Southwestern. Dr. Bhandari Randhawa co-led the study with David Rahn, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UTSW. Read more.

Source: UT Southwestern Medical Center, June 27, 2024

To Pee Or Not to Pee? That Is a Question for the Bladder — and the Brain

You’re driving somewhere, eyes on the road, when you start to feel a tingling sensation in your lower abdomen. That extra-large Coke you drank an hour ago has made its way through your kidneys into your bladder. “Time to pull over,” you think, scanning for an exit ramp.  To most people, pulling into a highway rest stop is a profoundly mundane experience. But not to neuroscientist Rita Valentino, who has studied how the brain senses, interprets and acts on the bladder’s signals. She’s fascinated by the brain’s ability to take in sensations from the bladder, combine them with signals from outside of the body, like the sights and sounds of the road, then use that information to act — in this scenario, to find a safe, socially appropriate place to pee. “To me, it’s really an example of one of the beautiful things that the brain does,” she says. Read more.

Source: Knowable Magazine, May 29, 2024

measuring tape obesity

Abdominal Obesity Might Predict Risk of Fecal Incontinence

Fecal incontinence (FI), or involuntary loss of bowel control, significantly impacts quality of life and mental health for millions of adults in the U.S. Obesity is thought to affect bowel function, but the relationship between its standardized measure, body mass index (BMI), and FI remains unclear. Examining better markers of obesity that include body composition and fat distribution, rather than BMI alone, could help clarify the effect of obesity on FI. Read more.

Source: Medical Xpress, April 22, 2024

Could Botox Injections Help Patients…Down There? A New Study Suggests That Botox Can Help with Fecal Incontinence

Researchers are testing rectal injections of Botox to see whether they might help patients manage fecal incontinence—so far, results are promising. If future studies confirm success, doctors could provide patients with new ways to manage this hard-to-control condition.  In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, researchers treated nearly 200 patients for fecal incontinence using Botox or a placebo. Ninety-six patients received Botox, and 95 received the placebo treatment after nine patients withdrew from the trial before receiving injections.  Read more.

Source: MDLinx, January 29, 2024

Understanding the Link Between Urinary Incontinence in Women and Disability Risk: Insights from Recent Medical Research

Urinary incontinence, a condition that affects millions of women worldwide, may have more severe implications than previously thought. A recent study from the Rush University Medical Center has added a new dimension to our understanding of this common health issue. According to the study, urinary incontinence in women is linked with a higher risk of disability. This finding is significant and has implications for both the management and treatment of urinary incontinence in women. Read more.

Source: Medriva, January 12, 2024

Higher Rate of Bladder Neck Incompetence in Mixed Urinary Incontinence

Patients with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) have a higher rate of bladder neck incompetence (BNI), according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the World Journal of Urology.  Yu-Chen Chen, from the Kaohsiung Medical University in Taiwan, and colleagues conducted a retrospective analysis involving 184 patients with stress UI (SUI), MUI, urge UI (UUI), or dry overactive bladder (OAB) who underwent transrectal ultrasound between 2017 and 2022. In all included patients, the presence of BNI and urethral incompetence was recorded. Read more.

Source: Medical Xpress, November 1, 2023

Hydrogel-based Sensor Improves Outlook For People With Overactive Bladder

Overactive bladder syndrome (OBS) causes a frequent, uncontrolled urge to urinate, which can interfere with a person’s daily activities and affect their mental health. A new hydrogel-based device has been developed that can continuously monitor overactive bladders and has the potential to improve the treatment of the condition. Read more.

Source: New Atlas, March 13, 2023

mother post pregnancy

Decades-Long Suffering From Obstetric Injuries

Bowel leakage, the need for anal incontinence protection and a restricted social life may cause severe, decades-long suffering among women with obstetric injuries to the anal opening, according to a study from the University of Gothenburg.  The study, published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, comprises a total of more than 11,000 women who had given birth vaginally in Sweden, twice, in the years 1987-2000. Read more.

Source: Science Daily, February 23, 2023

woman poor elderly

Overactive Bladder Linked to Multiple Unmet Socioeconomic Needs

Unmet socioeconomic needs had a significant association with overactive bladder (OAB), adding to evidence of a complex interaction between social determinants of health and OAB, researchers said. Stressors such as housing and food insecurity and concerns about personal health as much as tripled the odds of reported OAB symptoms. The stressors remained significant predictors for OAB after adjustment for multiple demographic and medical factors. Unmet socioeconomic needs had a stronger association with OAB with urge urinary incontinence (UUI, “wet” OAB), reported Elisabeth M. Sebesta, MD, of Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, and co-authors in the Journal of Urology. Read more.

Source: MedPage Today, December 1, 2022

depression elderly nursing home

Tailoring Continence Management to Individual Needs in Residential Care

This observational study investigated the benefits of adopting a person-centred approach to the management of urinary incontinence and associated hygiene care. A trial was carried out in 12 residential care homes in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy. Toileting, containment product selection, frequency and timing of changes, and personal hygiene routines were tailored to the needs of individual residents. Skin redness improved, there was less leakage and residents’ wellbeing improved. Containment product changes were easier to carry out, fewer containment products were used, and product costs were reduced. The adoption of person-centred care initiatives was seen to benefit all stakeholders – namely, residents, caregivers and the administration of the residential care facility. Read more.

Source: Nursing Times, March 7, 2022