medical research

Tiny, Implantable Device Uses Light to Treat Bladder Problems

A team of neuroscientists and engineers has developed a tiny, implantable device that has potential to help people with bladder problems bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators.  The team—from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago—created a soft, implantable device that can detect overactivity in the bladder and then use light from tiny, biointegrated LEDs to tamp down the urge to urinate. The device works in laboratory rats and one day may help people who suffer incontinence or frequently feel the need to urinate. The new strategy is outlined in an article published Jan. 2 in the journal Nature. Read more.

Source: Medical Xpress, January 2, 2019

imaging brain head

Certain Sites of Brain Lesions in MS Tied to Bowel Incontinence

Specific locations of cerebral multiple sclerosis lesions appear to be associated with bowel incontinence, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in the Journal of Neuroimaging.  Kilian Frohlich, M.D., from the University Hospital Erlangen in Germany, and colleagues used a voxel-wise lesion symptom mapping analysis to assess associations between bowel incontinence and cerebral multiple sclerosis lesions identified on magnetic resonance imaging of 51 patients. The researchers found associations between fecal incontinence in a total of 93 lesioned voxels, with 63 voxels located in the gray matter and 30 voxels in the white matter.  Read more.

Source: Practice Update, December 17, 2018

older woman elderly

Health Declines Are More Rapid in Older Women with Urinary Incontinence

As women age, their ability to get around affects their quality of life. A new study shows that older women’s physical functioning declines more rapidly if they develop urinary incontinence, according to public health researchers at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Catherine Pirkle and Yan Yan Wu, both assistant professors in the Office of Public Health Studies in the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work, collaborated with researchers in Brazil, Colombia and Canada to recruit approximately 900 women in their sixties and seventies from those three countries plus Albania. About 25 percent of women over age 60 experience urinary incontinence. Study participants completed a short test of physical functioning, which included measuring the speed of their usual walking pace, checking their balance and testing how fast they could stand up from a chair. The women also completed a questionnaire about their health, which included a query about whether they had experienced any leakage of urine in the past week. After two years, the women repeated the physical functioning test. Read more.

Source: University of Hawai’i News, October 11, 2018

catheter coating research

Incontinence Affects More Than 200m People Worldwide, So Why Isn’t More Being Done to Find a Cure?

For a chronic health condition that causes shame and misery for countless people and costs billions, urinary incontinence keeps a low profile.  Media reports about chronic health conditions appear with alarming regularity, but it is rare to read about the debilitating impact of the involuntary leakage of urine. Nevertheless, urinary incontinence is a condition which, next to Alzheimer’s or strokes, is reported as most negatively affecting “health-related quality of life”.  The reasons for this are not too hard to fathom. Urinary incontinence, of course, elicits some embarrassment. And there also seems to be a feeling this is a low priority condition: urinary incontinence does not directly bear up against the terrible impacts of life threatening conditions and illnesses. Read more.

Source: The Conversation, February 14, 2018