Behavioral Treatment Reduces Urinary Incontinence

A new group-administered behavioral treatment program was safe, cost-effective, reduced urinary incontinence frequency and severity, and improved quality of life among older women, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.  “Urinary incontinence guidelines recommend behavioral interventions as first-line treatment using individualized approaches,” Ananias C. Diokno, MDfrom the department of urology at Beaumont Hospital, Michigan, and colleagues wrote. “A one-time, group-administered behavioral treatment could enhance access to behavioral treatment.”  Read more.

Source: Helio, September 5, 2018

nurse and patient

Screening for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Recommendation

Recommendation on screening for urinary incontinence in women by the Women’s Preventive Services Initiative (WPSI), a national coalition of women’s health professional organizations and patient representatives. The WPSI’s recommendations are intended to guide clinical practice and coverage of services for the Health Resources and Services Administration and other stakeholders. The target audience for this recommendation includes all clinicians providing preventive health care for women, particularly in primary care settings. This recommendation applies to women of all ages, as well as adolescents. Read more.

Source: Annals of Internal Medicine, August 14, 2018

Nearly 1 in 2 Women Aged 45+ Report Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence occurs in nearly 1 in 2 women aged 45 years and older, a new study suggests.  The study examined survey results from 143,096 women at baseline (2006–2009) and 59,060 women who participated in a follow-up survey (2012–2015). The prevalence of urinary leakage reported in these surveys was 44% and 44.6%, respectively, Kristine Concepcion, MD, MPH, of Family Planning NSW Ashfield in New South Wales, Australia, and colleagues reported in Neurourology and UrodynamicsRead more.

Source: Renal and Urology News, August 2, 2018

women friends

New Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) Classification for Women Proposed

Women seeking care for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) cluster into 4 distinct symptom groups that differ from conventional clinical diagnostic groups, investigators concluded.  A team led by Victor P. Andreev, PhD, of Arbor Research Collaborative for Health in Ann Arbor, Michigan, conducted a cluster analysis using baseline urinary symptoms questionnaire data from 545 care-seeking women enrolled in the Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Research Network (LURN) Observational Cohort Study. They identified 4 clusters (F1 through F4). Women in cluster F1 did not report incontinence but experienced post-void dribbling, frequency, and voiding symptoms. Women in cluster F2 reported urgency incontinence as well as urgency and frequency and very minimal voiding symptoms or stress incontinence. Women in cluster F3 reported all types of incontinence, urgency, frequency, and very mild voiding symptoms. Women in cluster 4 report all LUTS at uniformly high levels. Read more.

Source: Renal & Urology News, July 23, 2018

pelvic vaginal mesh stress urinary incontinence Polypropylene vaginal mesh

Government Agrees to Temporarily Ban Vaginal Mesh Implants for Women with Urinary Incontinence

The [UK] government has accepted a recommendation to temporarily ban vaginal mesh implants for women with urinary incontinence.  The Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review concluded there must be an immediate pause in the use of surgical mesh to treat stress-urinary incontinence (SUI) – a condition where urine leaks out when the bladder is under pressure.  It comes after the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) ruled last year against vaginal mesh as a treatment for pelvic organ collapse, but stated devices could still be used to treat SUI and to repair hernias in men or women. Read more.

Source: Independent, July 9, 2018

mother post pregnancy

Stress Incontinence – A Hidden Disease Finds Some Light

While many of us have seen the ads for Attends, the problem being treated, urinary stress incontinence in women, is rarely mentioned [1]; and that is odd for a problem that by some reports effects 25% of women over age 25. (The incidence of breast cancer is about 12%). A recent article in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology sheds light on this somewhat unmentioned disease.  Urinary incontinence is the involuntary passing of urine, frequently associated with coughing, laughing or any activity that causes a person to bear down. It is a result of the loss of support for the bladder, rectum, and vagina – all the structures of the pelvis and is most often seen in women after childbirth. For all the beauty and miracles of birth, passing an eight-pound object through the vagina causes some wear and tear. But physicians know little about the natural history and progression of this loss of pelvic support (clinically termed prolapse). The study provides a better understanding of the course of the disease and some possible milestones. Read more.

Source: American Council on Science and Health, April 3, 2018

mother post pregnancy

More Than Just a Cosmetic Procedure — ‘Tummy Tuck’ Reduces Back Pain and Incontinence

In addition to restoring the pre-pregnancy shape of the abdomen, abdominoplasty (‘tummy tuck’) surgery with muscle repair can improve back pain and urinary incontinence after childbearing, reports a study in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).  Although abdominoplasty is classified as a cosmetic procedure, it also improves two of the most common physical complaints experienced by women after labor and delivery. According to the new research “Abdominoplasty has a proven functional benefit as well as a cosmetic benefit,” comments lead author D. Alastair Taylor, FRACS, of The CAPS Clinic in Deakin, Australia. Read more.

Source: EurekAlert, February 28, 2018

women friends

Women Have Many Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence

Roughly half of adult women may experience urinary incontinence, but few of them get diagnosed and treated despite a wide range of options to address the problem, doctors say.  Women are particularly prone to stress urinary incontinence, when the pelvic floor muscles are too weak to support the bladder. As a result, urine leaks during coughing, sneezing or exercise. Childbirth is a common reason for weak pelvic muscles, and obesity worsens the problem. Urge incontinence, in contrast, doesn’t have a clear cause, although it can sometimes happen due to neurological problems, the authors note. Some women may get both types of incontinence at once or develop bladder problems due to a urinary tract infection. Read more.

Source: Reuters, October 24, 2017

Florence Italy ICS 2017

GTx Announces Positive Results from Enobosarm Phase 2 Clinical Trial

GTx, Inc. (Nasdaq: GTXI) today announced top-line clinical trial results demonstrating that a daily dose of enobosarm 3 mg (GTx-024) substantially improved stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women, as well as related quality of life measurements. In this open-label clinical trial, all 17 patients completing 12 weeks of treatment saw a clinically significant reduction (50 percent or greater) in stress leaks per day, compared to baseline. Mean stress leaks decreased by 83 percent from baseline over 12 weeks, and the reductions in daily stress leaks following completion of treatment have been sustained as patients are being followed for up to 7 months post-treatment to assess the durability of treatment effect. No patient has relapsed to her baseline levels. These results were presented at the International Continence Society (ICS) Annual Meeting currently being held in Florence, Italy from September 12-15, 2017. Read more.

Source: Business Wire, September 13, 2017

DNA genetics

New Genomic Analysis Promises Benefit in Female Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence in women is common, with almost 50% of adult women experiencing leakage at least occasionally. Genetic or heritable factors are known to contribute to half of all cases, but until now studies had failed to identify the genetic variants associated with the condition. Speaking at the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today (Monday), Dr Rufus Cartwright, MD, a visiting researcher in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College, London, UK, will say that his team’s investigations hold out the promise that drugs already used for the treatment of other conditions can help affected women combat this distressing problem. Read more.

Source: Medical Xpress, May 29, 2017