children pediatric classroom

Bristol-based children’s incontinence charity marks its 30th anniversary

The UK’s only charity dedicated to bowel and bladder health in children and teenagers in the UK – based in Bristol – today (May 1) marks its 30th anniversary. ERIC has been providing valuable support and advice to parents and children struggling with incontinence, a condition that continues to be heavily stigmatised, for more than three decades and has commemorated its big birthday by making the help it provides even more accessible.  In the UK an estimated 900,000, or 1 in 12, 5-19 year olds suffer from bowel and bladder conditions – including bedwetting, daytime wetting, constipation and soiling. Read more.

Source: BristolLive, May 1, 2019

student studying

Incontinence: ‘Lack of Support’ for Older Children

For Gruff, double incontinence has made some days at secondary school an anxious and humiliating experience.  Campaigners claim there is a lack of support in Wales, estimating that 1 in 10 UK children suffer bedwetting, daytime accidents and constipation.  The Welsh Government said it expected health boards to provide specialist-led continence services for under-19s. Read more.

Source: BBC News, April 25, 2019

school pediatric health

Urinary Incontinence May Affect Learning and Academic Performance of Teenagers

Continence problems are among the most common pediatric health problems. It’s commonly believed that continence problems resolve with age in all children.  However, severe incontinence in childhood can persist into adolescence.  New research has found teenagers with incontinence are at greater risk of underachieving academically, and need more support to remove barriers so they can reach their academic potential. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in teens is around three to four percent and around one percent suffer from bowel incontinence. The research by academics at the University of Bristol, and published in the British Journal of Health Psychology, explored the impact of the secondary school environment on young people with incontinence and is the only detailed qualitative study carried out in this area in the UK. Read more.

Source: News-Medical.net, December 12, 2017

Bedwetting in Children (Nocturnal Enuresis)

mother child bedwetting

Mother checking her sleeping child who sometimes has bedwetting problems.

Nighttime bedwetting is called nocturnal enuresis or enuresis. Most children out grow bedwetting by the age of five, but many children at age seven (5% – 15%) continue to experience problems becoming continent – staying dry at night. Many of these children will stop bedwetting in their late childhood or teen years, but some will continue to experience enuresis into adulthood (0.5% – 1% in adults). Rarely, adults who did not previously experience enuresis will begin to experience bedwetting. A sudden onset of enuresis in adulthood can be a warning sign of serious health issues like diabetes, a urinary tract infection (UTI) or neurologic conditions and so a healthcare professional should be quickly consulted.Continue reading