Apple iPhone

New System Uses Remote Medical Monitoring, Mobile Games to Improve At-Home Pelvic Floor Muscle Training

Urinary incontinence is any involuntary urine leakage. It is a condition that can be more or less severe and it affects one in three women of all ages, which is more than 56 million people in Europe and more than 350 million people in the world. It is not a normal part of ageing and has a negative impact on the quality of life of the women who suffer from it. The main risk factors for urinary incontinence are pregnancy and childbirth, overweight and obesity, and high-impact sports. There are several treatments to improve or cure its symptoms, depending on the type of incontinence, and it can also be prevented by taking measures before it appears.  One approach that has proven effective in preventing and treating stress urinary incontinence is pelvic floor muscle training. It consists of a programme of contraction and relaxation exercises for the muscles that form the base of the pelvis. If the treatment is followed and performed correctly with the supervision of a therapist, the rate of cure/improvement may reach 70% .Read more.

Source: News-Medical.net, March 9, 2017

hormones change as women age

When Bathroom Runs Rule the Day (and Night)

I have only one regret about not having been born a male, and it concerns plumbing, namely how easy it is for men to eliminate liquid waste,  whether by avoiding long bathroom lines or being able to relieve themselves discreetly when no facility is available.  My male envy grew after I contracted poison ivy on unmentionable parts when nature called during a hike in the woods. Urination has long been a vexing problem for women.  Read more.

Source: New York Times, December 12, 2016

pregnant woman birth childbirth

Women Who Have Not Given Birth Also Experience Urinary Incontinence, Study Finds

Women who have not given birth often end up under the radar for research on urinary incontinence. In a study of this group, however, one in five women over 45 years say they experience this type of incontinence.  “This confirms that problems are found in all groups, and that women have a weakness of the pelvic floor even if they have not previously given birth,” says Maria Gyhagen, gynecologist at Södra Älvsborg Hospital in Borås and researcher at Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University. Read more.

Source: News-Medical.net, November 9, 2016

female doctor

Too Few Female Urologists to Meet Aging Patients’ Demand

Women prefer to see female urologists, but there are far too few to meet a growing demand, a new study reports. Researchers analyzed patient data from 2003 to 2012 for more than 6,000 urologists across the United States. Women represented 54 percent of patients for female urologists, and 32 percent for male urologists, the study found. Of an estimated 9,600 U.S. urologists, between 8 percent and 12 percent are women, according to the study. Read more.

Source: HealthDay News, August 22, 2016

A Pessary for the Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women

pessary

A pessary may be used by a woman who is experiencing urinary incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse.

A pessary is a small device made of silicone, often shaped like a diaphragm or a cube, which is inserted into the vagina of a woman to help support her pelvic organs. Pessaries are used to treat pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence. Continue reading