women exercising

FDA Grants DeNovo Clearance to Atlantic Therapeutics for INNOVO® Therapy Device to Treat Stress Urinary Incontinence

Atlantic Therapeutics, a global manufacturer of innovative, garment-based pelvic floor muscle strengthening and nerve stimulation products, announced today (13.11.18) that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted a DeNovo clearance for its INNOVO® therapy device, an externally worn electrical muscle stimulator for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in adult females. INNOVO® is the first transcutaneous electrical stimulation continence device to be cleared by the FDA, following results of two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) demonstrating it to be an effective and low-risk device for the treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in adult females.  Read more.

Source: Business Wire, November 13, 2018

hormones change as women age

Renovia Launches “REDUCE” – a Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial to Study Next-Generation leva® Pelvic Digital Therapeutic System for Urinary Incontinence

Renovia Inc. (“Renovia”), a company dedicated to discovering and delivering first-line digital therapeutic and diagnostic devices for women with pelvic floor disorders, today announced it has launched a large, multi-center randomized controlled trial (RCT) to study the efficacy of a first-line non-surgical digital therapeutic for the treatment of stress-dominant urinary incontinence (UI). Pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME), also known as Kegel exercises, are the widely accepted first-line conservative treatment for pelvic floor disorders including stress, urgency, and mixed UI within the urogynecology, urology and physical therapy communities. However, many women have trouble identifying and contracting the correct muscles when performing these exercises, and remembering to perform the exercises regularly can be challenging. Read more.

Source: Business Wire, November 12, 2018

exercise women

Nearly Half of Women Over 50 Experience Incontinence, but Most Haven’t Talked to a Doctor

Nearly half of women over 50 say they sometimes leak urine — a problem that can range from a minor nuisance to a major issue — according to a new national poll.  Of more than 1,000 women between the ages of 50 and 80 who answered the poll, 43 percent of women in their 50s and early 60s said they had experienced urinary incontinence, as had 51 percent of those age 65 and over. Yet two-thirds of these women hadn’t talked to a doctor about the sometimes embarrassing, little-discussed issue. And only 38 percent said they do exercises that can strengthen the muscles that can help keep urine in. The poll shows they’re finding ways of coping on their own – from using pads or special underwear to wearing dark clothing and limiting fluid intake.  Read more.

Source: MHealth Lab, OCtober 31, 2018

Nearly 1 in 2 Women Aged 45+ Report Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence occurs in nearly 1 in 2 women aged 45 years and older, a new study suggests.  The study examined survey results from 143,096 women at baseline (2006–2009) and 59,060 women who participated in a follow-up survey (2012–2015). The prevalence of urinary leakage reported in these surveys was 44% and 44.6%, respectively, Kristine Concepcion, MD, MPH, of Family Planning NSW Ashfield in New South Wales, Australia, and colleagues reported in Neurourology and UrodynamicsRead more.

Source: Renal and Urology News, August 2, 2018

mother post pregnancy

Stress Incontinence – A Hidden Disease Finds Some Light

While many of us have seen the ads for Attends, the problem being treated, urinary stress incontinence in women, is rarely mentioned [1]; and that is odd for a problem that by some reports effects 25% of women over age 25. (The incidence of breast cancer is about 12%). A recent article in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology sheds light on this somewhat unmentioned disease.  Urinary incontinence is the involuntary passing of urine, frequently associated with coughing, laughing or any activity that causes a person to bear down. It is a result of the loss of support for the bladder, rectum, and vagina – all the structures of the pelvis and is most often seen in women after childbirth. For all the beauty and miracles of birth, passing an eight-pound object through the vagina causes some wear and tear. But physicians know little about the natural history and progression of this loss of pelvic support (clinically termed prolapse). The study provides a better understanding of the course of the disease and some possible milestones. Read more.

Source: American Council on Science and Health, April 3, 2018

sleep woman nocturia

Sleep Quality Improves with Help of Incontinence Drug

A drug used to curtail episodes of urinary incontinence in women also improves quality of sleep, a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine reports.  People who experience urinary incontinence, especially at night, often have trouble maintaining normal sleep cycles. Now, the Stanford researcher sees promise in using one drug to help remedy both problems.  “Two of the biggest quality-of-life factors for older women are poor sleep quality and incontinence, and the older you get, the more prevalent both conditions are, and they do seem to be correlated,” said Leslee Subak, MD, professor and chair of obstetrics and gynecology. “And so, if we can find a drug to treat one and effectively decrease the other too, that could be big for improving quality of life.”  Read more.

Source: Stanford Medicine News Center, January 11, 2018

You may also with to read:  Incontinence Drug May Help Sleep Dysfunction in Older Women

pregnant woman birth childbirth

Women Who Have Not Given Birth Also Experience Urinary Incontinence, Study Finds

Women who have not given birth often end up under the radar for research on urinary incontinence. In a study of this group, however, one in five women over 45 years say they experience this type of incontinence.  “This confirms that problems are found in all groups, and that women have a weakness of the pelvic floor even if they have not previously given birth,” says Maria Gyhagen, gynecologist at Södra Älvsborg Hospital in Borås and researcher at Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University. Read more.

Source: News-Medical.net, November 9, 2016

female doctor

Botox Beats Implant for Urinary Incontinence in Women

For women with bladder incontinence who haven’t been helped by medications or other therapies, Botox injections may help control leakage better than an implanted nerve stimulation device, a new study suggests. However, both treatments are effective, according to doctors who treat the condition. In a head-to-head comparison, women given Botox saw their number of daily urgency incontinent episodes decrease by four, on average, compared to three for women who received the implant, called InterStim.  Botox patients also said they had a greater reduction in symptoms and were more satisfied with the treatment, the researchers said.  Read more.

Source: HealthDay News, October 4, 2016