female doctor

New Research Takes P*** Out of Incontinence

Millions of people might eventually be spared the embarrassment and extreme isolation caused by wetting themselves, thanks to new research. One in every five people has a lower urinary tract disorder called overactive bladder which, for some, means not being able to hold in urine, needing to go to the toilet often, or waking in the night to empty their bladder. Some wear sanitary towels or disposable underwear, while others worry that even with absorbent underwear, they’ll smell of urine, so they choose instead to stay at home. Now, scientists at the University of Portsmouth have identified chemicals in urine that are specific to overactive bladder. The next step is to develop a gadget similar to a pregnancy test, to see if these chemical markers are present. Such a device is 12-24 months from clinical trials, but the early signs are encouraging. Read more.

Source: EurekAlert,, February 20, 2020

clostridium difficile C. diff

Microrobots Take Minutes to Detect C. diff in Stool Samples

Detecting bacterial infestations within the GI system, particularly using low cost methods, takes so much time that treatment is often administered too late. Clostridium difficile (C. diff) is a particular nasty nuisance that kills many frail patients, and even with a hospital lab it can take up to two days to get the results.  Researchers at Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) have developed fluorescent microrobots that can spot C. diff in a stool sample within a matter of minutes without relying on expensive laboratory equipment. Read more.

Source: Medgadget, February 15, 2019

doctor and patient

Screening for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Recommendation

Recommendation on screening for urinary incontinence in women by the Women’s Preventive Services Initiative (WPSI), a national coalition of women’s health professional organizations and patient representatives. The WPSI’s recommendations are intended to guide clinical practice and coverage of services for the Health Resources and Services Administration and other stakeholders. The target audience for this recommendation includes all clinicians providing preventive health care for women, particularly in primary care settings. This recommendation applies to women of all ages, as well as adolescents. Read more.

Source: Annals of Internal Medicine, August 14, 2018