business buildings

Coloplast Expands Its Luja™ Portfolio with Next Generation Catheter for Women

The female intermittent catheter enables complete bladder emptying in one free flow, aiming to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections.  Following the successful launch of Luja with Micro-hole Zone Technology, a next generation intermittent catheter for men, Coloplast is now launching Luja for women.  “So far, we have received great feedback on Luja for men in our product evaluations. Nearly all healthcare professionals would recommend the male catheter to their patients, and seven out of ten users feel confident that it empties their bladder completely without needing to reposition the catheter4,” says Nicolai Buhl, Executive Vice President of Innovation. Read more.

Source: Globe Newswire, May 14, 2024

business buildings

Coloplast Launches Male Catheter Designed to Reduce the Risk of Urinary Tract Infections

The new intermittent catheter Luja™ addresses important risk factors for urinary tract infections, a significant burden for people using intermittent catheters as well as healthcare systems as a whole. Urinary tract infections represent a significant challenge for people who use intermittent catheters to empty their bladder. This includes people living with spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, or spina bifida. On average, intermittent catheter users have 2-3 urinary tract infections per year, which can lead to serious health complications, have a significant impact on quality of life, and result in hospitalisation, thereby putting pressure on local healthcare systems.  Read more.

Source: Yahoo News, February 2, 2023

business buildings

Coloplast to Introduce SpeediCath Flex Set Catheter in US

Danish medical device company Coloplast is set to launch its new SpeediCath Flex Set catheter in the US this month. The new catheter is a gentle, all-in-one solution that has been developed for people living with bladder and urinary problems. It features a no-touch dry sleeve as well as an omnidirectional tip, which can bend to follow the curves of the urethra.  The SpeediCath Flex Set has a soft-squeeze grip that safely guides the tip into the urethra without making contact. It helps patients catheterise at home or away and also supports them in managing conditions and sustaining healthy lifestyles. Read more.

Source: Medical Device Network, November 21, 2022

pelvic vaginal mesh stress urinary incontinence Polypropylene vaginal mesh

FDA Halts All Sales of Pelvic Mesh Products Tied to Injuries in Women

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday announced a ban on the sale of all pelvic mesh products.  The surgical mesh is typically used to repair pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and incontinence, but reported side effects have included permanent incontinence, severe discomfort and an inability to have sex.  “In order for these mesh devices to stay on the market, we determined that we needed evidence that they worked better than surgery without the use of mesh to repair POP,” said Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “That evidence was lacking in these premarket applications, and we couldn’t assure women that these devices were safe and effective long term.” Read more.

Source: HealthDay News, April 16, 2019

abdominal pain

Nurses Welcome NICE Support for Irrigation Device for Constipation and Faecal Incontinence

A medical device for treating constipation and faecal incontinence has been recommended for health service use by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.  Specialist stoma care nurses working with both children and adults affected by faecal continence problems welcomed the decision by NICE to back the use of the Peristeen transanal irrigation system.In new medical technology guidance published today, NICE said the “case for adopting” the Peristeen for managing bowel dysfunction was “supported by the evidence”.  According to NICE, the system can “reduce the severity of constipation and incontinence, improve quality of life and promote dignity and independence”.  Read more.

Source: Nursing Times, February 23, 2018