business buildings

Astellas Makes Another Gene Therapy Play with Juventas Deal

Astellas has made another deal in the gene therapy category, licensing a candidate for treating faecal incontinence from US biotech Juventas Therapeutics. Terms of the deal haven’t been disclosed, but Astellas says it has taken an exclusive option on the non-viral gene therapy – called JVS-100 and in early-stage clinical development – in all world markets except China. It’s paying an upfront fee and will also fund preclinical and clinical studies of the therapy. JVS-100 is Ohio-based Juventas’ lead product candidate and delivers the gene sequence for stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), a naturally occurring signalling protein that is thought to activate the body’s tissue repair pathways, using a plasmid vector. The agreement grants Astellas a licence to develop JVS-100 through phase 2a clinical studies, with an option to acquire the therapy for further development and commercialisation if all goes according to plan. Juventas has already tested the candidate in early-stage trials involving more than 180 patients in other indications, including repeat administrations, and says it has no significant side effects. Read more.

Source: PMLiVE, November 23, 2018

business buildings

The Journal of Urology Publishes Valencia’s Excellent Feasibility Data on eCoin™ for Overactive Bladder

Last week, The Journal of Urology published the feasibility data of Valencia Technologies’ (“Valencia“) eCoin™ device indicated for treatment of overactive bladder.  The manuscript, “Feasibility of a fully-implanted, nickel-sized and shaped tibial nerve stimulator for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome with urgency urinary incontinence,” details the design of Valencia’s 46 patient study and the study’s excellent clinical results.  The manuscript has an embargo date of February 15, 2019. Implanted in a 20-minute office procedure across seven clinical centers in the United States and New Zealand, the coin-sized and shaped tibial nerve stimulator is distinctly simple to implant in stark contrast to a highly invasive and operator dependent therapy called sacral nerve stimulation. An author of the eCoin™ publication, Dr. Vincent Lucente, concludes, “I believe tibial nerve stimulation with eCoin™ will become the therapy of choice for patients after medications are tried. These early results clearly show a better therapy is on the horizon for patients with urinary incontinence.” Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, November 1, 2018

mother post pregnancy

Stress Incontinence – A Hidden Disease Finds Some Light

While many of us have seen the ads for Attends, the problem being treated, urinary stress incontinence in women, is rarely mentioned [1]; and that is odd for a problem that by some reports effects 25% of women over age 25. (The incidence of breast cancer is about 12%). A recent article in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology sheds light on this somewhat unmentioned disease.  Urinary incontinence is the involuntary passing of urine, frequently associated with coughing, laughing or any activity that causes a person to bear down. It is a result of the loss of support for the bladder, rectum, and vagina – all the structures of the pelvis and is most often seen in women after childbirth. For all the beauty and miracles of birth, passing an eight-pound object through the vagina causes some wear and tear. But physicians know little about the natural history and progression of this loss of pelvic support (clinically termed prolapse). The study provides a better understanding of the course of the disease and some possible milestones. Read more.

Source: American Council on Science and Health, April 3, 2018

product approval

Axonics® Receives IDE Clearance from US FDA to Conduct Pivotal Study

Axonics Modulation Technologies, Inc., developer of the first rechargeable sacral neuromodulation (r-SNM™) system for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) and bowel dysfunction, today announced the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has granted an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) in accordance with 21 CFR 812 regulations allowing Axonics to conduct a pivotal study designed to gain FDA approval in the United States.  “During 2017, as part of the IDE process, the FDA conducted a significant review of our product. A major focus of the technical review was the long-term safety of our implant. The fact that we were able to support our anticipated 15-year full system life-in-the-body claim based on our robust design and development processes, risk analysis and extensive validation testing is testament to the high-quality work of our team,” said Raymond W. Cohen, Chief Executive Officer of Axonics. “Given the demand in the U.S. market for SNM therapy, gaining FDA approval is our main focus. To that end, we fully intend to execute this well-designed pivotal study with velocity and in the best interests of patients.” Read more.

Source: Pharmaweb, November 7, 2017

Florence Italy ICS 2017

Positive Results for the Axonics® RELAX-OAB Clinical Presented at ICS

Axonics Modulation Technologies, Inc., developer of the first rechargeable Sacral Neuromodulation (r-SNM™) system for the treatment of urinary and bowel dysfunction, today announced the presentation of positive results from its prospective, multicenter clinical study at the 2017 International Continence Society (ICS) Congress in Florence, Italy.  The presentation, entitled “A prospective multicenter clinical study evaluating a miniaturized rechargeable sacral neuromodulation system for the safe and effective treatment of overactive bladder (RELAX-OAB study),” was delivered by Bertil F.M. Blok, M.D., PhD, Dept. of Urology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, Netherlands.  Read more.

Source: Business Wire, September 13, 2017

female doctor

Botox Beats Implant for Urinary Incontinence in Women

For women with bladder incontinence who haven’t been helped by medications or other therapies, Botox injections may help control leakage better than an implanted nerve stimulation device, a new study suggests. However, both treatments are effective, according to doctors who treat the condition. In a head-to-head comparison, women given Botox saw their number of daily urgency incontinent episodes decrease by four, on average, compared to three for women who received the implant, called InterStim.  Botox patients also said they had a greater reduction in symptoms and were more satisfied with the treatment, the researchers said.  Read more.

Source: HealthDay News, October 4, 2016