fiber rich diet for bowel retraining

FODMAP Diet Helps Fecal Incontinence

Two-thirds of patients with fecal incontinence associated with loose stool experienced an improvement in symptoms when following a low FODMAP diet, a researcher reported here. “Fecal incontinence is an underappreciated complaint, and patients often suffer in silence,” said Stacy Menees, MD, of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, in a presidential plenary session at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG).  In an earlier, large population-based study of more than 71,000 people, one in seven reported having had fecal incontinence at some point in their lives. Of these, one-third reported fecal incontinence in the last 7 days, which is often associated with diarrhea and loose stool. People with diarrhea have a 5.6-fold higher risk of fecal incontinence, and people with urgency have a more than 8-fold risk of diarrhea. “So if we are going to help people with fecal incontinence, the key is to concentrate on their stool consistency,” Menees said. Read more.

Source: MedPage Today, October 8, 2018

abdominal pain

Nurses Welcome NICE Support for Irrigation Device for Constipation and Faecal Incontinence

A medical device for treating constipation and faecal incontinence has been recommended for health service use by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.  Specialist stoma care nurses working with both children and adults affected by faecal continence problems welcomed the decision by NICE to back the use of the Peristeen transanal irrigation system.In new medical technology guidance published today, NICE said the “case for adopting” the Peristeen for managing bowel dysfunction was “supported by the evidence”.  According to NICE, the system can “reduce the severity of constipation and incontinence, improve quality of life and promote dignity and independence”.  Read more.

Source: Nursing Times, February 23, 2018

Learning to Live with Bladder and Bowel Incontinence

My Story – Submitted by: Shawn

Hello all! My name is Shawn and I am 39 years old and I am bowel and bladder incontinent. This started for me about 2 years ago. Well, l started out driving dump trucks for months and theses guys were dropping 2-3 thousand pound rocks into my truck. Jarred the snot out of me and knocked the wind right out of me several times. I started having issues with balance, feeling lightheaded all the time, blood pressure issues, couldn’t think or reason. And then one day I was sitting in bed talking to my wife, and wammo! I was wet. Soaked! Started having issues during the day peeing my pants and started wetting at night.Continue reading

Gallbladder, Kidney Stones, and Incontinence

My Story – Submitted by: Anonymous

I’ve always had some bedwetting problems, but in the last few years they have become worse due to the fact that I have passed several kidney stones over the years, and it has affected my kidneys, and caused me to wet the bed more than usual. I have tried several different things, and none of them seem to have any affect on the bedwetting problem. Continue reading

Functional Incontinence

bathroom functional incontinence

Keeping a bathroom free of trip hazards will help a person with functional incontinence.

Functional incontinence is urinary or fecal leakage that occurs when the urinary or fecal body systems, respectively, are physiologically working fine. Functional incontinence is the result of mobility challenges with getting to the bathroom and/or dexterity challenges with removing clothing in a reasonable amount of time.Continue reading

Bowel Incontinence or Accidental Bowel Leakage (ABL)

bowel incontinence occurs in the digestive system

Bowel incontinence or ABL occurs when stool or gas unexpectedly leaks from your rectum.

Bowel incontinence, which may also be referred to as fecal incontinence, anal incontinence or Accidental Bowel Leakage (ABL), is when stool or gas unexpectedly leaks from your rectum. Sometimes you feel the urge to have a bowel movement, but can’t reach a bathroom in time.

The U.S. National Institutes of Health’s Bowel Control Awareness Campaign reports that more than 18 million Americans have bowel incontinence. As with urinary incontinence, bowel incontinence affects people of all ages, races, and both sexes. However, it is more common in women than in men, and it affects the elderly more often than younger adults (although it is not a normal part of aging).Continue reading

Neurogenic Bowel

human digestive system

A neurogenic bowel includes both the small and large intestine.

A neurogenic bowel is when your bowel malfunctions (it does not do what it is supposed to do) because of a disease or an injury to the nervous system. The bowel includes both the small and large intestine (also called the colon).Continue reading

Antidiarrheal Medications and Laxatives

antidiarrheal medications laxatives for bowel problems

Problems in the bowel can lead to the need for antidiarrheal medications and laxatives.

Antidiarrheal medications and laxatives can be used either to either bulk up stool (in the case of diarrhea) or soften stool (in the case of constipation).  Diarrhea may cause a person to have bowel incontinence and constipation may cause a person to have overflow diarrhea and bowel incontinence.

NOTE:  Medications and laxatives can be used to treat a variety of different types of bowel incontinence but should always be discussed first with a doctor or medical professional.

Antidiarrheal medications and laxatives are less invasive than surgery and may be tried as a first- line of treatment.  They can be stopped at any time if the desired results are not achieved or of the side-effects are undesirable.Continue reading

Fiber Therapy for Bowel Incontinence

granola fiber therapy

Fiber therapy includes adding whole grains and fresh fruits to your diet.

Fiber absorbs liquids in the digestive system, thereby bulking up fecal matter. It is recommended that women under 50 consume 25 grams of fiber per day. A woman over 50 years of age should consume 21 grams per day. Men younger under 50 are recommended to get 38 grams per day. Men over 50 should get 30 grams per day in his diet. The average American, however, only has about 15 grams of fiber per day in his or her diet. And what is fiber therapy?  Fiber therapy is simply increasing your fiber intake gradually until you reach the recommended daily intake for your age.

Continue reading

Dietary Changes for Managing Bowel Incontinence

eliminating alcohol as part of dietary changes

Alcohol may be part of some dietary changes needed to manage bowel incontinence symptoms.

Foods that commonly contribute to diarrhea and bowel incontinence are chocolate, dairy products, alcohol, and caffeine. Try eating less of these foods to see if it improves the consistency of your bowel movements. In addition to adding  fiber to your diet, other dietary changes may include undergoing an elimination diet to see if certain foods trigger incontinence of stool.Continue reading