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InControl Medical Introduces Attain at CES 2019

InControl Medical is proud to announce that Attain, the most advanced over-the-counter device available to treat male and female incontinence and the logical first choice for treatment, will be shown at the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show (CES, January 8-11, Las Vegas Sands, Halls A-D – 43569). According to Herschel “Buzz” Peddicord, InControl’s founder and CEO, “This revolutionary medical device is designed to help treat the approximately 87 million people in the U.S. suffering with stress, urge, or mixed urinary incontinence, and/or bowel incontinence. Attain provides muscle stimulation, visual biofeedback, and a guided exercise program to solve incontinence at the source — the muscle level. Attain’s regular self-treatment program, in the privacy of one’s home, eliminates the need for pads, meds, surgery or diapers.” Read more.

Source: Business Wire, January 8, 2019

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Overactive Bladder Linked to Prostate Cancer ADT

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer is associated with an increased risk of overactive bladder (OAB), a finding consistent with an inhibitory role of androgen in modulating male voiding dysfunction, according to a new study.  Compared with ADT recipients, healthy men and men receiving alpha blockers for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) had a significant 98% and 30% decreased risk of OAB, respectively, after adjusting for numerous potential confounding factors. Increased ADT duration increased the cumulative risk of OAB. Read more.

Source: Renal & Urology News, January 7, 2019

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Tiny, Implantable Device Uses Light to Treat Bladder Problems

A team of neuroscientists and engineers has developed a tiny, implantable device that has potential to help people with bladder problems bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators.  The team—from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago—created a soft, implantable device that can detect overactivity in the bladder and then use light from tiny, biointegrated LEDs to tamp down the urge to urinate. The device works in laboratory rats and one day may help people who suffer incontinence or frequently feel the need to urinate. The new strategy is outlined in an article published Jan. 2 in the journal Nature. Read more.

Source: Medical Xpress, January 2, 2019

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Prevalence of Urological Complications Among People Who Have Type 1 Diabetes

Major complications of type 1 diabetes include retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease. Other complications that are less studied are urological conditions. Urological complications can be severe for people who have type 1 diabetes.  Some complications include sexual dysfunction, urinary tract infections, lower urinary tract symptoms, and urinary incontinence. Quality of life is a major concern with urological conditions and can negatively affect a person’s health. In addition, these issues are associated with higher A1C levels. The Urologic Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (UroEDIC) was established to study these complications. Read more.

Source: Diabetes in Control, December 22, 2018

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Risk of Pelvic Floor Disorders Varied by Child Delivery Mode

The risk of pelvic floor disorders for women years after childbirth varied depending on mode of delivery, researchers found. Women with cesarean delivery had a lower hazard of stress urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, and pelvic organ prolapses compared with women with spontaneous vaginal deliveries, reported Joan L. Blomquist, MD, of Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Maryland, and colleagues. By contrast, women with operative vaginal delivery were associated with a higher hazard of anal incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse, they wrote in JAMA.  Read more.

Source: MedPage Today, December 18, 2018

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InterStim Incontinence and Bladder Control Implant Now Controlled via App

Medtronic won FDA approval to introduce the InterStim smart programmer to control the company’s InterStim neurostimulation system used to manage overactive bladder, bowel incontinence, and some types of urinary retention.  The InterStim system delivers sacral neuromodulation therapy via an implant that looks similar to a cardiac pacemaker.  Read more.

Medgadget, December 17, 2018