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Hollister Incorporated Introduces the Infyna Chic Intermittent Catheter – a Uniquely Discreet Catheter for Women

Hollister Incorporated, a US-based company that develops, manufactures, and markets healthcare products and services worldwide, has launched the Infyna Chic intermittent catheter, the latest in the company’s line of female hydrophilic catheter products. Designed to help provide women who use catheters with a high level of discretion, the new catheter received CE approval in December 2018. The Infyna Chic catheter will be joining the Infyna Standard and Plus catheters to complete the Infyna portfolio, offering women a range of options to meet their individual needs. In the coming months, the product will be available in Europe and Canada. Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, February 27, 2019

 

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Axonics® Submits Pivotal Clinical Data to U.S. Food & Drug Administration for its Sacral Neuromodulation System

Axonics Modulation Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: AXNX) a medical technology company focused on the development and commercialization of novel implantable Sacral Neuromodulation (“SNM”) devices for the treatment of urinary and bowel dysfunction, today announced the submission of pivotal clinical data from the ARTISAN-SNM pivotal clinical study designed to gain marketing approval from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (“FDA”) for the Axonics r-SNM® System1.  The ARTISAN-SNM study is a 129-patient single-arm, prospective, multi-center, unblinded pivotal clinical study approved under an FDA Investigational Device Exemption (“IDE”) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the Axonics r-SNM System for urinary dysfunction.  Read more.

Source: Business Wire, February 26, 2019

product approval introduction

Axonics Sacral Neuromodulation for Urinary and Fecal Dysfunctions Cleared for MRI in Europe

Axonics, based in Irvine, California, won European regulatory approval for MRI conditional labeling for its sacral neuromodulation (SNM) system for treatment of overactive bladder, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence. The Axonics SNM system is now compatible, given certain precautions, with 1.5 Tesla and 3 Tesla MRI scanners. It is the only SNM system cleared in Europe with such labeling. The implant is rechargeable, and so can be used for much longer periods than similar devices that have to be replaced with fresh batteries. The company promises a lifetime of up to 15 years, Axionics claims is three times longer than Medtronic’s InterStim. Additionally, it’s 60% smaller. Read more.

Source: Medgadget, February 26, 2019

product approval introduction

EchoNous Releases AI Powered Ultrasound Bladder Scanner

Scanning the bladder and measuring its volume is a common procedure usually performed by nurses. It may be done for a variety of reasons, but achieving accuracy is key. Catheterization-based methods may be the most accurate, but non-invasive ultrasound is a lot more attractive.  With conventional ultrasound one must be very careful to properly gauge the margins of the bladder, then essentially use a ruler on a 3D object, and finish using a formula that really only provides a rough estimate. EchoNous, based in Redmond, Washington, has released a device that lets nurses measure bladder volume faster and with greater confidence, hopefully resulting in more accurate numbers. Read more.

Source: Medgadget, February 20, 2019

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Topical Gel Gets Fast-Tracked for Fecal Incontinence in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Fast Track designation to RDD-0315, a novel topical gel for the treatment of fecal incontinence in spinal cord injury patients.  RDD-0315 contains the alpha-agonist oxymetazoline in a topical gel formulation; it works by contracting the internal anal sphincter muscle. In a randomized, controlled crossover study involving 19 patients with spinal cord injury, the investigational gel was found to be beneficial, due to the local effect of oxymetazoline; a statistically significant reduction in the number of fecal incontinence episodes was observed 8 hours and 12 hours post-administration. Read more.

Source: MPR, February 15, 2019

clostridium difficile C. diff

Microrobots Take Minutes to Detect C. diff in Stool Samples

Detecting bacterial infestations within the GI system, particularly using low cost methods, takes so much time that treatment is often administered too late. Clostridium difficile (C. diff) is a particular nasty nuisance that kills many frail patients, and even with a hospital lab it can take up to two days to get the results.  Researchers at Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) have developed fluorescent microrobots that can spot C. diff in a stool sample within a matter of minutes without relying on expensive laboratory equipment. Read more.

Source: Medgadget, February 15, 2019