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Crohn’s and Colitis Canada Wants Businesses to Open Their Washrooms to Those In Need

Crohn’s and Colitis Canada is taking aim at a serious hurdle many Canadians with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis face – accessing washrooms on the go. November is Crohn’s and Colitis Awareness Month, and the national charity is advocating that public washroom access is a right, not a privilege, and for the Canadians living with these chronic diseases, it’s a critical need.  Crohn’s and colitis are debilitating, yet often invisible, autoimmune diseases. They cause the body to attack healthy tissue, leading to the inflammation of all or part of the digestive tract. Symptoms include diarrhea, internal bleeding, and abdominal pain, and result in the frequent and urgent need to use the washroom, in some cases over 20 times a day.  Read more.

Source: CNW, November 1, 2017

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November Marks National Bladder Health Month

November is National Bladder Health Month and, for a second year, the Urology Care Foundation, American Urological Association (AUA) and the Bladder Health Alliance – a coalition of groups representing physicians, patients and veterans – have teamed up to support Bladder Health Month. Designed to raise awareness about bladder conditions, encourage individuals to talk with their healthcare providers about the symptoms they are experiencing and to generate support for those affected by bladder health issues, this month-long awareness campaign was developed to increase an individual’s focus on “Getting the Facts, Getting Diagnosed and Taking Control” of their Bladder Health. Read more.

Source: Markets Insider, November 1, 2017

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Women Have Many Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence

Roughly half of adult women may experience urinary incontinence, but few of them get diagnosed and treated despite a wide range of options to address the problem, doctors say.  Women are particularly prone to stress urinary incontinence, when the pelvic floor muscles are too weak to support the bladder. As a result, urine leaks during coughing, sneezing or exercise. Childbirth is a common reason for weak pelvic muscles, and obesity worsens the problem. Urge incontinence, in contrast, doesn’t have a clear cause, although it can sometimes happen due to neurological problems, the authors note. Some women may get both types of incontinence at once or develop bladder problems due to a urinary tract infection. Read more.

Source: Reuters, October 24, 2017

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Trouble Urinating? New Technique Can Help Men with Enlarged Prostate (BPH)

Men: As you age, there’s a good chance you may get up several times a night to empty your bladder. The problem is that your bladder doesn’t empty completely.  No matter how hard to you try, you can only deliver a trickle before returning to bed. In a few hours, you are up again. The process repeats itself all night.  For many men, this frustrating scenario is the result of an enlarged prostate that is squeezing the urethra, which prevents the bladder from emptying completely. When the problem is caused by a noncancerous condition, it’s called benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH).  Until recently, the only way to free the urethra and restore urine flow was to have a physician cut or vaporize the prostate. But this surgery can leave men with a degree of incontinence or impotence.  A new alternative that uses steam holds promise in treating BPH. Researchers developed an entirely new approach to treating BPH by using steam to kill prostate cells and shrink the prostate. The outpatient procedure is performed in about five minutes using a local anesthetic. Most men see improved urine flow in three to six weeks and dramatic improvement in three months.  Read more.

Source: Cleveland Clinic, October 20, 2017

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New Report Indicates No Evidence AHT Pelvic Exercise Works

Abdominal hypopressive technique (AHT), an exercise method widely touted for 20 years as a way of controlling bladder leakage and pelvic organ prolapse, doesn’t work, according to a new report.  AHT is a breathing exercise developed in the 1980s by Belgian physiotherapist Marcel Caufriez. Highly popular, it is taught by more than 1500 practitioners in 14 countries, including in Australia.  But a report published last week in the British Journal of Sports Medicine finds no scientific evidence to support the claimed benefits of AHT.  Authors Kari Bo, of the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, in Oslo, and Saul Martín-Rodríguez, of the College of Physical Education, in Las Palmas, Spain, acknowledge the “worldwide huge interest” in AHT but say it “lacks scientific evidence to support its benefits. At this stage, AHT is based on a theory with 20 years of clinical practice.” Read more.

Source: Cosmos Magazine, October 18, 2017

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Lib Dems call for Incontinence Prevention Training in Scotland

Midwives, health visitors and other health professionals should get specific training on incontinence prevention, as part of a new nationwide continence strategy in Scotland, according to the Liberal Democrats.  Scottish Liberal Democrat health spokesman Alex Cole-Hamilton, MPS for Edinburgh Western, said it was time to tackle taboos around the subject that can prevent sufferers seeking treatment. In a motion put to the Scottish parliament, he suggested a national continence strategy could help improve the quality of life of hundreds of thousands of people across the country. Read more.

Source: Nursing Times, October 13, 2017