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Most Transient SUI After HoLEP Resolves Within 6 Weeks

Most men who experience transient stress urinary incontinence (SUI) following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) recover full bladder control within the first 6 weeks after the procedure, according to study findings presented at the International Continence Society’s 2018 annual meeting.  In addition, the study identified prostate size larger than 100 g and catheter dependency prior to HoLEP, and longer operative time as risk factors for transient SUI.  A retrospective review of 515 patients who underwent HoLEP showed that 53 (10.3%) experienced transient SUI, Jenny Guo, BS, and colleagues at Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, reported. Transient SUI resolved within the first 6 weeks post-operatively in 47 (88.6%) of these patients and within 6 week to 3 months in 6 patients (11.3%). Read more.

Source: Renal and Urology News, August 30, 2018

exercise women

ICS 2018: Atlantic Therapeutics Exhibit New Data Demonstrating Comparable Efficacy, Increased Tolerability and Reduced Infection Risk of its Non-invasive Device Innovo® in Treating Stress Urinary Incontinence

Atlantic Therapeutics, a global manufacturer of innovative, garment-based pelvic floor muscle strengthening and nerve stimulation products, exhibits data highlighting comparable safety and efficacy of its INNOVO® therapy, an externally worn electrical muscle stimulation device for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence, with greatly reduced risk of infection and improved user tolerability over existing intravaginal probe devices1.  Presented as a poster at the 48th Annual Meeting of the International Continence Society, the data was the result of an FDA designed clinical trial, with patients whose condition had not improved using pelvic floor muscle training. Supporting Atlantic Therapeutics’ FDA approval via the De Novo route for INNOVO®. Designed for at home use and worn as a close-fitting pair of shorts, INNOVO® was compared with an existing FDA approved intravaginal stimulation product as control. Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, August 28, 2018

bladder retraining timed intervals

TARIS Announces Positive Topline Data for TAR-302 in Patients with Idiopathic Overactive Bladder

 TARIS, a biopharmaceutical company developing transformational therapies to treat people with debilitating urological disorders, today announced positive preliminary safety and efficacy data from its clinical study of TAR-302 for the treatment of patients with idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB) refractory to oral therapy. Subjects in the Phase 1b study received a single TAR-302 system, which provides continuous local dosing of the approved antimuscarinic agent trospium into the bladder. Subjects who were experiencing an average of more than five daily urge incontinence episodes demonstrated a reduction in mean daily episodes of 75% following dosing for 42 days (p=0.0049). Based on the unmet need in this disease state and the efficacy demonstrated in this study on established endpoints, TARIS plans to rapidly advance this program into later stage trials. “The results of this study suggest TAR-302 may come to represent an innovative new approach to treating overactive bladder,” said Michael J. Kennelly, M.D., FACS, Professor of Urology at Carolinas Medical Center, Medical Director of the Charlotte Continence Center and Women’s Center of Pelvic Heath, and Principal Investigator of the TAR-302 clinical studies. “There is a substantial need for alternative options in the management of OAB when patients fail oral therapies. The compelling efficacy observed to date with TAR-302, in the absence of side-effects, represents a potentially significant advance in the development of improved therapies for these patients.” Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, August 28, 2018

silence, stigma, taboo

Time to Tackle ‘Taboo’ Over Continence Issues, Warn Charities

The 10 charities, including Alzheimer’s Society, Age UK, Marie Curie, warned that the taboo around the topic forces those affected to struggle in silence and more research is needed.  As a result, the organisations held a workshop where common problems and solutions for incontinence issues were discussed by patients, carers, researchers and clinicians. Others involved include Parkinson’s UK, Guts UK, the Urology Foundation, Devices for Dignity, the National Institute for Health Research, and the James Lind Alliance. A report based on the meeting – titled My bladder and bowel own my life and published today – recommends tackling the stigma and funding research into the issue. Read more.

Source: Nursing Times, August 22, 2018

Magnetic Stimulation Restores Bladder Control in Paralyzed Men

Patients with spinal cord injuries report that in addition to paralysis the lack of bladder control is one of the most troubling issues. At University of California Los Angeles, researchers have shown that they were able to restore significant bladder control to five men that suffered through spinal cord injuries years prior to treatment. The researchers used transcutaneous magnetic spinal cord stimulation as their technique, delivering pulses of focused magnetic fields to the site of the injuries. Similar technology was just cleared in the United States to treat obsessive compulsive disorder. Read more.

Source: Medgadget, August 22, 2018

doctor and patient

Screening for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Recommendation

Recommendation on screening for urinary incontinence in women by the Women’s Preventive Services Initiative (WPSI), a national coalition of women’s health professional organizations and patient representatives. The WPSI’s recommendations are intended to guide clinical practice and coverage of services for the Health Resources and Services Administration and other stakeholders. The target audience for this recommendation includes all clinicians providing preventive health care for women, particularly in primary care settings. This recommendation applies to women of all ages, as well as adolescents. Read more.

Source: Annals of Internal Medicine, August 14, 2018