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Latest Research, Industry, Medical and Scientific News

tibial nerve

StimGuard Launches Head-to-Head Trial Against Medtronic’s InterStim

StimGuard yesterday announced plans for a clinical trial comparing its nerve stimulator with the InterStim sacral nerve stimulator made by Medtronic (NYSE:MDT).  Pompano Beach, Fla.-based StimGuard is already running a pivotal study of its technology, a miniature implantable device designed to treat urinary incontinence resulting from refractory overactive bladder syndrome. The device is implanted at the tibial nerve through a needle-sized introducer and uses wireless technology to stimulate the nerve. Read more.

Source: Massdevice, March 1, 2018

mother post pregnancy

More Than Just a Cosmetic Procedure — ‘Tummy Tuck’ Reduces Back Pain and Incontinence

In addition to restoring the pre-pregnancy shape of the abdomen, abdominoplasty (‘tummy tuck’) surgery with muscle repair can improve back pain and urinary incontinence after childbearing, reports a study in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).  Although abdominoplasty is classified as a cosmetic procedure, it also improves two of the most common physical complaints experienced by women after labor and delivery. According to the new research “Abdominoplasty has a proven functional benefit as well as a cosmetic benefit,” comments lead author D. Alastair Taylor, FRACS, of The CAPS Clinic in Deakin, Australia. Read more.

Source: EurekAlert, February 28, 2018

abdominal pain

Nurses Welcome NICE Support for Irrigation Device for Constipation and Faecal Incontinence

A medical device for treating constipation and faecal incontinence has been recommended for health service use by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.  Specialist stoma care nurses working with both children and adults affected by faecal continence problems welcomed the decision by NICE to back the use of the Peristeen transanal irrigation system.In new medical technology guidance published today, NICE said the “case for adopting” the Peristeen for managing bowel dysfunction was “supported by the evidence”.  According to NICE, the system can “reduce the severity of constipation and incontinence, improve quality of life and promote dignity and independence”.  Read more.

Source: Nursing Times, February 23, 2018

Apple iPhone

BewellConnect’s MyPeriTens Multi-Action Pelvic Floor Trainer

BewellConnect recently unveiled their new pelvic floor muscle trainer to help women with related issues, including post-partum complications and incontinence. The MyPeriTens device is both an electrical nerve stimulator and electrical muscle stimulator that is controlled through a smartphone app, allowing women to have precise control over the intensity and nature of the electrical signals delivered.  The smartphone app has a number of routines built in that the woman can perform on her own, or with assistance of a physical therapist. Each routine can be selected to run at the patient’s preferred intensity level, maximizing benefits while keeping any pain and discomfort at a minimum.  Read more.

Source: Medgadget, February 15, 2018

catheter coating research

Incontinence Affects More Than 200m People Worldwide, So Why Isn’t More Being Done to Find a Cure?

For a chronic health condition that causes shame and misery for countless people and costs billions, urinary incontinence keeps a low profile.  Media reports about chronic health conditions appear with alarming regularity, but it is rare to read about the debilitating impact of the involuntary leakage of urine. Nevertheless, urinary incontinence is a condition which, next to Alzheimer’s or strokes, is reported as most negatively affecting “health-related quality of life”.  The reasons for this are not too hard to fathom. Urinary incontinence, of course, elicits some embarrassment. And there also seems to be a feeling this is a low priority condition: urinary incontinence does not directly bear up against the terrible impacts of life threatening conditions and illnesses. Read more.

Source: The Conversation, February 14, 2018

Polypropylene vaginal mesh

New Vaginal Mesh Material Could Help Thousands of Women Affected By Life Changing Complications

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have developed a material that could be used as an alternative to the current vaginal mesh material, polypropylene, used to treat pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence.  The use of these current meshes, in particular surgical procedures, has led to severe complications for millions of women across the world and is now banned in Australia.  The research conducted by the University of Sheffield, published today in the journal Neurourology and Urodynamics, provides evidence which supports the use of a softer and more elastic material better suited for use in the pelvic floor and one that releases oestrogen into the surrounding pelvic tissue to form new blood vessels and ultimately speed up the healing process. Read more.

Source: EurekAlert, February 13, 2018