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Screening for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Recommendation

Recommendation on screening for urinary incontinence in women by the Women’s Preventive Services Initiative (WPSI), a national coalition of women’s health professional organizations and patient representatives. The WPSI’s recommendations are intended to guide clinical practice and coverage of services for the Health Resources and Services Administration and other stakeholders. The target audience for this recommendation includes all clinicians providing preventive health care for women, particularly in primary care settings. This recommendation applies to women of all ages, as well as adolescents. Read more.

Source: Annals of Internal Medicine, August 14, 2018

Nearly 1 in 2 Women Aged 45+ Report Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence occurs in nearly 1 in 2 women aged 45 years and older, a new study suggests.  The study examined survey results from 143,096 women at baseline (2006–2009) and 59,060 women who participated in a follow-up survey (2012–2015). The prevalence of urinary leakage reported in these surveys was 44% and 44.6%, respectively, Kristine Concepcion, MD, MPH, of Family Planning NSW Ashfield in New South Wales, Australia, and colleagues reported in Neurourology and UrodynamicsRead more.

Source: Renal and Urology News, August 2, 2018

women friends

FDA Warns About ‘Deceptive’ Vaginal Rejuvenation Claims

Procedures marketed to improve a woman’s “intimate health” using lasers or ultrasound are not only unapproved, but are also causing burns and other painful damage, the Food and Drug Administration said Monday. The FDA has warned seven companies that are promoting their devices for these procedures, and issued a general alert for patients and doctors. The agency has also warned the public against asking for such procedures.  The laser and ultrasound equipment used in these unapproved procedures has FDA approval for removing genital warts, other growths and in operations such as hysterectomies. But they have not been shown to tighten up muscles, increase sexual pleasure or relieve pain during intercourse, the FDA said. Read more.

Source: NBC News, July 30, 2018

microbiologist at laboratory work

Technology for Incontinence Hasn’t Developed That Much Since Ancient Egyptian Times

Today’s healthcare is full of technology that would seem like science fiction to our grandparents. But this is far from true in every area: some remain woefully neglected by innovation. Hop in a time machine back to ancient Egypt and you would find recognisable examples of the absorbent pads and catheters which are still a mainstay in the management of incontinence today.  The earliest known reference to an absorbent pad dates from 4th-century Egypt: the female scientist Hypatia is recorded as having thrown her menstrual rag at a student to ward off his infatuation with her. The pad remained a homemade “product” for many centuries until the 19th century, when manufactured versions of reuseable “antiseptic cotton for absorbing discharges” could be purchased from pharmacies. Disposable pads, first produced by Kotex in 1920, were in widespread use by the late 1930s. Since then, the only major innovation in their design has been the introduction of super absorbent polymers in the 1980s, which have dramatically improved absorbency. Read more.

Source: The Conversation, July 30, 2018

women friends

New Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) Classification for Women Proposed

Women seeking care for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) cluster into 4 distinct symptom groups that differ from conventional clinical diagnostic groups, investigators concluded.  A team led by Victor P. Andreev, PhD, of Arbor Research Collaborative for Health in Ann Arbor, Michigan, conducted a cluster analysis using baseline urinary symptoms questionnaire data from 545 care-seeking women enrolled in the Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Research Network (LURN) Observational Cohort Study. They identified 4 clusters (F1 through F4). Women in cluster F1 did not report incontinence but experienced post-void dribbling, frequency, and voiding symptoms. Women in cluster F2 reported urgency incontinence as well as urgency and frequency and very minimal voiding symptoms or stress incontinence. Women in cluster F3 reported all types of incontinence, urgency, frequency, and very mild voiding symptoms. Women in cluster 4 report all LUTS at uniformly high levels. Read more.

Source: Renal & Urology News, July 23, 2018

Derick Fage

Breakfast Television Montreal Host Has Unique Take on Potty Humour

Breakfast Television Montreal co-host Derick Fage has joked that doctors made him an asshole. Thing is, though, they did. He was born without one — the condition is known as a high imperforate anus — and, despite surgery to create an anal opening, he has contended all his life with fecal incontinence. That means, among other things, that if he goes to a restaurant, he makes sure to know where the washroom is — because if he needs it, he needs it right away. If he is, say, hosting a charity event, he’ll pop a couple of Imodium pills beforehand. Accidents at work are rare, but they happen. “Just a few weeks ago, I had a major accident live on the air.” He handed over to his co-host and left the set to clean up and change into the spare set of clothes he keeps at work. Today Fage, 48, speaks publicly about his condition in a bid to help others living with its challenges. In April at the Global Forum on Incontinence in Rome, he gave an eloquent and emotional address, last year in Laval he gave a TEDx talk, and he is an ambassador and champion for the Canadian Continence Foundation. Read more.

Source: Montreal Gazette, July 19, 2018