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fiber rich diet for bowel retraining

FODMAP Diet Helps Fecal Incontinence

Two-thirds of patients with fecal incontinence associated with loose stool experienced an improvement in symptoms when following a low FODMAP diet, a researcher reported here. “Fecal incontinence is an underappreciated complaint, and patients often suffer in silence,” said Stacy Menees, MD, of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, in a presidential plenary session at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG).  In an earlier, large population-based study of more than 71,000 people, one in seven reported having had fecal incontinence at some point in their lives. Of these, one-third reported fecal incontinence in the last 7 days, which is often associated with diarrhea and loose stool. People with diarrhea have a 5.6-fold higher risk of fecal incontinence, and people with urgency have a more than 8-fold risk of diarrhea. “So if we are going to help people with fecal incontinence, the key is to concentrate on their stool consistency,” Menees said. Read more.

Source: MedPage Today, October 8, 2018

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

Kyorin Receives Approval from Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for Vibegron for Overactive Bladder

Urovant Sciences, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing novel therapies for urologic conditions, today announced that Kyorin Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. (Kyorin) received marketing approval from Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for vibegron for the treatment of adults with overactive bladder (OAB) in Japan.  Kyorin licensed vibegron for Japan from Merck & Co., Inc. in 2014, and later expanded the license to include certain other Asian countries in 2017. Urovant licensed rights to vibegron for the United States and the rest of the world from Merck, Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. in 2017 and subsequently entered into a collaboration agreement with Kyorin later that year. Under the collaboration agreement, Urovant and Kyorin share information related to the development of vibegron, including clinical trial and nonclinical study data. Read more.

Source: The News, October 1, 2018

sleep woman nocturia

The Medical Condition 72 Percent of Americans Don’t Know About Is Stealing Sleep and Disrupting Lives, Survey Shows

Sleepless nights can be costly. They interfere with daily activities and work productivity and leave one feeling tired and irritable. If left untreated, sleep loss can result in serious medical consequences. A leading cause of sleep loss is a medical condition called nocturia,1 which a staggering 72 percent of Americans have never heard about, according to a new national online survey of 2,040 U.S. adults conducted by The Harris Poll, and endorsed by Caregiver Action Network, National Association for Continence, Prostate Conditions Education Council, and The Simon Foundation for Continence.  Nocturia forces individuals to get up more than once per night to urinate. Nocturia has many contributing causes, but in most cases, it is caused by the kidneys producing too much urine at night, known as nocturnal polyuria. The poll shows that while nocturia may affect more than a third of U.S. adults, 64 percent of Americans have no idea it is a diagnosable, treatable medical condition. Worse yet, 66 percent of nocturia sufferers2 surveyed have never talked to their doctor or healthcare professional about it. Half of those patients reported they thought it was a normal part of aging; 27 percent said they believed that nothing could be done about it. Read more.

Source: Global Newswire, September 12, 2018

 

Behavioral Treatment Reduces Urinary Incontinence

A new group-administered behavioral treatment program was safe, cost-effective, reduced urinary incontinence frequency and severity, and improved quality of life among older women, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.  “Urinary incontinence guidelines recommend behavioral interventions as first-line treatment using individualized approaches,” Ananias C. Diokno, MDfrom the department of urology at Beaumont Hospital, Michigan, and colleagues wrote. “A one-time, group-administered behavioral treatment could enhance access to behavioral treatment.”  Read more.

Source: Helio, September 5, 2018

elderly underactive bladder symptoms needed to be reported

Mirabegron Safe, Effective for Overactive Bladder in the Elderly

Mirabegron is a safe and effective treatment for overactive bladder (OAB) in older patients, a researcher reported at the International Continence Society’s 2018 annual meeting.  Adrian Wagg, MB, BS, of the University of Alberta in Edmonton, presented findings from a 12-week phase 4 prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial that enrolled 888 patients older than 65 years who had OAB symptoms for 3 months or more. The mean age of the patients was about 72 years. The proportion of patients older than 75 years was 28% among mirabegron and placebo recipients.  Read more. 

Source: Renal and Urology News, August 31, 2018

doctor male discussion

Most Transient SUI After HoLEP Resolves Within 6 Weeks

Most men who experience transient stress urinary incontinence (SUI) following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) recover full bladder control within the first 6 weeks after the procedure, according to study findings presented at the International Continence Society’s 2018 annual meeting.  In addition, the study identified prostate size larger than 100 g and catheter dependency prior to HoLEP, and longer operative time as risk factors for transient SUI.  A retrospective review of 515 patients who underwent HoLEP showed that 53 (10.3%) experienced transient SUI, Jenny Guo, BS, and colleagues at Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, reported. Transient SUI resolved within the first 6 weeks post-operatively in 47 (88.6%) of these patients and within 6 week to 3 months in 6 patients (11.3%). Read more.

Source: Renal and Urology News, August 30, 2018