Research, Industry, Medical and Scientific News

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Below you will find news and press releases from industry, government, and academia regarding product developments and medical/scientific research news.

nocturia sleep normal

‘Sleep Normal’ Campaign Urges Americans to End Frequent Nighttime Urination and Stop Settling for Nights of Bad Sleep

Nearly 50 million Americans wake up to urinate more than once per night due to a treatable medical condition called nocturia.  A new awareness campaign called ‘Sleep Normal’ launched on Monday to raise awareness of nocturia, an underdiagnosed, treatable, medical condition that forces a person to wake more than once a night to urinate. Most people have never heard of nocturia and think it is a normal part of aging, despite the negative impact interrupted sleep can have on health. The ‘Sleep Normal’ campaign urges people to talk with their doctors about addressing frequent nighttime urination.  ‘Sleep Normal’ is a collaboration between Avadel Pharmaceuticals and the recently formed Nocturia Council, which includes American Alliance for Healthy Sleep, Caregiver Action Network, HealthyWomen, Men’s Health Education Council, Men’s Health Network, Multiple Sclerosis Association of America, National Association for Continence, National Sleep Foundation, Simon Foundation for Continence and ZERO – The End of Prostate Cancer. Read more.

Source: UroToday, January 24, 2019

accessible toilets

Closomat Cries Out for Installation of More Changing Places Toilets Across UK

Accessible toileting specialist Closomat has highlighted the importance of Changing Places facilities for disabled people, following the Government’s proposals to increase the number of Changing Places toilets in the UK. Around 6 million people in the UK are affected by continence issues, according to the latest figures from the NHS. For many, conventional ‘away from home’ toilets are still not suitable; they need more space, and/or equipment – a Changing Places toilet. Changing Places toilets are wheelchair-accessible units that are spacious and include a bench and hoist, which allow disabled people to use the toilet with dignity. It can help people with a wide range of disabilities, including people living with stroke, continence issues, cerebral palsy, arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Read more.

Source: ATtoday, January 21, 2019

operating room surgery

London Researchers Examine Psychological Fallout of Incontinence Surgery Complications

London researchers are zeroing in on the potential psychological effects of complications from women’s incontinence surgery, uncovering an increased risk of depression and self-harm after the corrective surgery.  Researchers at the Western University branch of Toronto-based Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and Lawson Health Research Institute — the research arm of the London Health Sciences Centre and St. Joseph’s Health Care London — examined patient outcomes after pelvic mesh implants from January 2004 to December 2012. Using 12 years of data from Ontario’s public health-care system, researchers studied the files of 57,611 women who underwent the midurethral mesh sling procedure during the study period. Of those, 1,586 went under the knife again to correct a complication from the mesh. Read more.

Source: The London Free Press, January 9, 2019

business buildings

InControl Medical Introduces Attain at CES 2019

InControl Medical is proud to announce that Attain, the most advanced over-the-counter device available to treat male and female incontinence and the logical first choice for treatment, will be shown at the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show (CES, January 8-11, Las Vegas Sands, Halls A-D – 43569). According to Herschel “Buzz” Peddicord, InControl’s founder and CEO, “This revolutionary medical device is designed to help treat the approximately 87 million people in the U.S. suffering with stress, urge, or mixed urinary incontinence, and/or bowel incontinence. Attain provides muscle stimulation, visual biofeedback, and a guided exercise program to solve incontinence at the source — the muscle level. Attain’s regular self-treatment program, in the privacy of one’s home, eliminates the need for pads, meds, surgery or diapers.” Read more.

Source: Business Wire, January 8, 2019

doctor male discussion

Overactive Bladder Linked to Prostate Cancer ADT

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer is associated with an increased risk of overactive bladder (OAB), a finding consistent with an inhibitory role of androgen in modulating male voiding dysfunction, according to a new study.  Compared with ADT recipients, healthy men and men receiving alpha blockers for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) had a significant 98% and 30% decreased risk of OAB, respectively, after adjusting for numerous potential confounding factors. Increased ADT duration increased the cumulative risk of OAB. Read more.

Source: Renal & Urology News, January 7, 2019

medical research

Tiny, Implantable Device Uses Light to Treat Bladder Problems

A team of neuroscientists and engineers has developed a tiny, implantable device that has potential to help people with bladder problems bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators.  The team—from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago—created a soft, implantable device that can detect overactivity in the bladder and then use light from tiny, biointegrated LEDs to tamp down the urge to urinate. The device works in laboratory rats and one day may help people who suffer incontinence or frequently feel the need to urinate. The new strategy is outlined in an article published Jan. 2 in the journal Nature. Read more.

Source: Medical Xpress, January 2, 2019

autonomic nerves

Prevalence of Urological Complications Among People Who Have Type 1 Diabetes

Major complications of type 1 diabetes include retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease. Other complications that are less studied are urological conditions. Urological complications can be severe for people who have type 1 diabetes.  Some complications include sexual dysfunction, urinary tract infections, lower urinary tract symptoms, and urinary incontinence. Quality of life is a major concern with urological conditions and can negatively affect a person’s health. In addition, these issues are associated with higher A1C levels. The Urologic Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (UroEDIC) was established to study these complications. Read more.

Source: Diabetes in Control, December 22, 2018