Bacteria

Weethinking the Role of Bacteria in Urinary Incontinence

We all know that feeling of suddenly needing to pee, and the agonizing worry that we might not find a toilet in time or make it that far. Sadly, for many people this is a regular occurrence and wetting themselves uncontrollably is an inevitable consequence.  Almost 1 in 5 women over the age of 44 suffer from what is known as Urgency Urinary Incontinence (UUI): experiencing a strong sensation of an urgent need to pee, followed by immediate leakage of a large volume of urine. It can severely adversely affect someone’s life, contributing to anxiety, depression and social isolation. Read more.

Source: EurekAlerts, October 7, 2016

female doctor

Botox Beats Implant for Urinary Incontinence in Women

For women with bladder incontinence who haven’t been helped by medications or other therapies, Botox injections may help control leakage better than an implanted nerve stimulation device, a new study suggests. However, both treatments are effective, according to doctors who treat the condition. In a head-to-head comparison, women given Botox saw their number of daily urgency incontinent episodes decrease by four, on average, compared to three for women who received the implant, called InterStim.  Botox patients also said they had a greater reduction in symptoms and were more satisfied with the treatment, the researchers said.  Read more.

Source: HealthDay News, October 4, 2016

US Senator Mark Kirk

Resolution Supporting November as “National Bladder Health Month” Introduced in Senate

The American Urological Association (AUA) and the Urology Care Foundation, together with the Bladder Health Alliance – a coalition of groups representing physicians, patients and veterans – today applauded Sen. Mark Kirk (R-IL) for introducing Senate Resolution 604, a measure supporting the designation of November 2016 as “National Bladder Health Month” in the United States.  “The introduction of this resolution by Sen. Kirk is an important step in increasing awareness of bladder conditions,” said Dr. Jim Ulchaker, chair of the AUA’s Legislative Affairs Committee. “Awareness is one of the first steps toward reducing the stigma associated with bladder conditions and empowering providers and patients to discuss bladder health.”  Read more.

Source: American Urological Association and Urology Care Foundation, October 6, 2016

Acupuncture

Can Acupuncture Ease Severe Constipation?

People with severe chronic constipation may get relief from a more modern type of acupuncture, new research suggests.  After eight weeks of treatment with electroacupuncture — acupuncture involving electrical stimulation — study participants experienced significant symptom and quality-of-life improvements, the study found.  Electroacupuncture uses thin needles inserted beneath the skin that are attached to a device that sends electric pulses into the body. Read more.

Source: Health News Day, September 12, 2016

female doctor

Too Few Female Urologists to Meet Aging Patients’ Demand

Women prefer to see female urologists, but there are far too few to meet a growing demand, a new study reports. Researchers analyzed patient data from 2003 to 2012 for more than 6,000 urologists across the United States. Women represented 54 percent of patients for female urologists, and 32 percent for male urologists, the study found. Of an estimated 9,600 U.S. urologists, between 8 percent and 12 percent are women, according to the study. Read more.

Source: HealthDay News, August 22, 2016

female athlete running thriathletes

Female Triathletes at Higher Risk for Pelvic Floor Disorders

Female triathletes are at a higher risk for several health issues, including pelvic floor disorders, new research indicates. Researchers conducted an internet survey of 311 self-identified female triathletes. Results showed a significant prevalence of pelvic floor disorders, with urinary incontinences (37.4 percent) and anal incontinence (28.0 percent) being the most common.  Read more.

Source: Science Daily, August 23, 2016

Stockholm, Sweden

Canadian Medical Technology Company LABORIE to Become New Subsidiary

Patricia Industries, a part of Investor AB, has signed an agreement with Audax Private Equity to acquire the Canadian medical technology company LABORIE, which focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of urologic and gastrointestinal disorders that affect the daily lives of millions. LABORIE was founded in 1967 and has grown organically and through acquisitions from a leading manufacturer of capital equipment for urodynamic testing into a fully-integrated medical device company with a market-leading position in urology and a rapidly growing gastroenterology business. Read more.

Source: Business Wire, August 19, 2016

microbiologist at laboratory work

BioLife Products Embedded in Cook MyoSite Phase 3 Cell Therapy Trial for Stress Urinary Incontinence

BioLife Solutions, Inc.(BioLife, a leading developer, manufacturer and marketer of proprietary clinical grade cell and tissue hypothermic storage and cryopreservation freeze media, announced that its media products are embedded into the autologous cell therapy being developed by Pittsburgh-based Cook MyoSite, a subsidiary of the Cook Group, for treatment of female stress urinary incontinence.  Read more.

Source: PharmaBiz.com, July 19, 2016

PeriCoach

FDA Approves OTC Availability of PeriCoach, an At-home Pelvic Floor Trainer Device

DENVER – Analytica on Wednesday announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the PeriCoach at-home pelvic floor trainer device and smartphone app as an over-the-counter treatment for mild, moderate and stress urinary incontinence and urge incontinence.  Pelvic floor muscle exercise is recommended as first line non-pharmacologic treatment for the millions of women – estimated at one in three – who suffer from urinary incontinence.  Read more.

Source: Drug Store News, July 13, 2016