Share

Latest Research, Industry, Medical and Scientific News

Urinary Implant Helps Patients With Incontinence Track Bladder Fullness

It’s hard for some folks who suffer illness-related urinary incontinence to judge whether they’ll be able to hold it until they get home, or if they should rush to a bathroom now.  There might soon be a new app for that.  A newly developed soft, flexible, battery-free implant attaches to the bladder wall and senses the organ filling with urine, according to researchers at Northwestern University in Chicago.  The implant wirelessly transmits data to a smartphone app, so patients can track their bladder fullness in real time, researchers said. Read more.

Source: UPI, March 26, 2024

Bacteria

How Urobiome Composition Impacts Urinary Incontinence

A urobiome community type with fewer Lactobacilli and more diverse bacteria is associated with more severe urinary incontinence (UI) episodes vs a type with high predominance of a single genus, Lactobacillus, according to a recent study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Bacteria has been categorized into various niches, including the bladder niche and adjacent vaginal niche in women. Sequencing methods allow for urothelial and squamous intracellular bacteria to be identified. These bacteria may serve as reservoirs for chronic conditions such as urinary tract infection (UTI). Read more.

Source: Contemporary OB/GYN, March 19, 2024

clinical medical

Affluent Medical Touts First Implant of Artificial Urinary Sphincter

Affluent Medical today announced the successful first-in-human implant of its minimally invasive urinary incontinence treatment device.  Dr. Roman Zachoval completed the first implant of Artus, an artificial urinary sphincter. Zachoval, head of urology at Thomayer University Hospital in Prague, implanted Artus in a 68-year-old male patient with severe urinary incontinence. Read more.

Source: Mass Device, March 12, 2024

VCU Health Leads Clinical Trial For New treatment To Help People With Bowel Control Problems

A research team at VCU Health is leading a clinical trial to assess a novel treatment for fecal incontinence or sudden loss of control over bowel movements. The therapy involves implanting a bioengineered sphincter derived from the patient’s native cells to help them regain control of their bowels.  The implantation surgery for the clinical trial is being led by Jaime Bohl, M.D., an associate professor in the Department of Surgery and chief of the Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery at Virginia Commonwealth University’s School of Medicine. Read more.

Source: VCU Health, February 28, 2024

nerve cells

Amber Therapeutics Announces Positive Preliminary Results From Its First-In-Human Investigation of Amber-UI, Its New Adaptive Implanted Pudendal Neuromodulation System for Urinary Incontinence

Amber Therapeutics (‘Amber’ or the ‘Company’), an innovative medical technology company developing next-generation, intelligent bioelectrical therapies to transform clinical outcomes in patients with functional disorders of the peripheral nervous system, announces the presentation of the first data from its AURA-2 (Augmenting Urinary Reflex Activity) first-in-human study evaluating Amber-UI.  Amber-UI is the first fully implantable closed-loop bioelectrical therapy in clinical development for urinary incontinence (UI), which is made possible by being able to access and target the pudendal nerve – the nerve that directly controls continence – through a novel, minimally invasive surgical procedure. Read more.

Source: WWLP.com, February 27, 2024

nurse and patient

Pelvital Announces Landmark Study Demonstrating Efficacy of Flyte® Device in Treating Stress Urinary Incontinence

Pelvital, the women’s health MedTech company on a mission to transform the standard of care for urinary incontinence, announced today the publication of its landmark paper “Randomized trial of mechanotherapy for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women” in the peer-reviewed journal Therapeutic Advances in Urology. The paper presents evidence of the efficacy of Pelvital’s novel, FDA-cleared device, Flyte, for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and weakened pelvic floor muscles, with results comparable to surgical intervention. Read more.

Source: PRNewsire, February 21, 2024