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Lower Survival Odds Better Than Incontinence/Impotence Say Men with Prostate Cancer

SOME men with prostate cancer are willing to accept lower survival odds to avoid incontinence, impotence and repeat treatments, according to researchers. Prostate cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in men but in many cases it is a slow growing disease with relatively good survival, even if left untreated. Treatment can include surgery or radiotherapy, but both can cause urinary incontinence and a loss of sexual function.  Some patients will spend weeks or months recovering from treatments and some may need a second round of treatment. A new British study suggests that while patients value a longer life, they also value quality of life and may be willing to choose less treatment on that basis. Read more.

Source: The Senior, November 13, 2018

women exercising

FDA Grants DeNovo Clearance to Atlantic Therapeutics for INNOVO® Therapy Device to Treat Stress Urinary Incontinence

Atlantic Therapeutics, a global manufacturer of innovative, garment-based pelvic floor muscle strengthening and nerve stimulation products, announced today (13.11.18) that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted a DeNovo clearance for its INNOVO® therapy device, an externally worn electrical muscle stimulator for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in adult females. INNOVO® is the first transcutaneous electrical stimulation continence device to be cleared by the FDA, following results of two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) demonstrating it to be an effective and low-risk device for the treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in adult females.  Read more.

Source: Business Wire, November 13, 2018

hormones change as women age

Renovia Launches “REDUCE” – a Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial to Study Next-Generation leva® Pelvic Digital Therapeutic System for Urinary Incontinence

Renovia Inc. (“Renovia”), a company dedicated to discovering and delivering first-line digital therapeutic and diagnostic devices for women with pelvic floor disorders, today announced it has launched a large, multi-center randomized controlled trial (RCT) to study the efficacy of a first-line non-surgical digital therapeutic for the treatment of stress-dominant urinary incontinence (UI). Pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME), also known as Kegel exercises, are the widely accepted first-line conservative treatment for pelvic floor disorders including stress, urgency, and mixed UI within the urogynecology, urology and physical therapy communities. However, many women have trouble identifying and contracting the correct muscles when performing these exercises, and remembering to perform the exercises regularly can be challenging. Read more.

Source: Business Wire, November 12, 2018

patient education OAB

Free Interactive Education Program Announced for Those Living With an Overactive Bladder

According to the American Urological Association, approximately 40% of women and 30% of men live with overactive bladder or OAB. Many people with OAB find it difficult to talk to their doctor or loved ones about their condition because of the stigma associated with it. Pro-ficiency, a leading provider of interactive online patient education tools, announces its collaboration with the Academy for Continued Healthcare Learning (ACHL) and the Simon Foundation for Continence, in their joint, interactive program, to educate people about how to speak with their healthcare providers and their loved ones to get the care they need. The program also discusses treatment options, how to manage social and lifestyle considerations, and incorporating shared-decision making into visits with health care providers. The program is freely available to all participants.  “ACHL & Pro-ficiency previously collaborated on a highly successful OAB educational activity, however, given the depth and breadth of OAB, it was clear that continued education was needed. ACHL is proud to continue the education movement with this most recent program,” adds Amanda Kaczerski, with ACHL. Read more.

Source: Newswire, November 5, 2018

bladder health

November is National Bladder Health Awareness Month

For a third year, the Urology Care Foundation, American Urological Association (AUA) and the Bladder Health Alliance – a coalition of groups representing physicians, patients and veterans – are drawing on the month of November to raise awareness about bladder conditions and encourage individuals to take an active role in managing their bladder health. Millions of Americans struggle with the impacts of such bladder conditions and disease as urinary incontinence, overactive and underactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, urinary tract infections, nocturia, bedwetting, bladder cancer and neurogenic bladder, on a daily basis. These conditions have a significant impact on an individual’s health and quality of life, and result in substantial health costs (estimated to be more than $70 billion per year). “Raising bladder health awareness and encouraging men and women to talk about their bladder health symptoms is a critical first step in eliminating the stigma associated with bladder-related conditions and disease,” said Harris Nagler, MD, President of the Urology Care Foundation. “It’s important for individuals to talk to their healthcare provider about what’s bothering them, including changes in their urinary function or urinary symptoms. Many times these conditions can be treated through simple lifestyle changes, oral medical treatments, diet and exercise.” Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, November 1, 2018

exercise women

Nearly Half of Women Over 50 Experience Incontinence, but Most Haven’t Talked to a Doctor

Nearly half of women over 50 say they sometimes leak urine — a problem that can range from a minor nuisance to a major issue — according to a new national poll.  Of more than 1,000 women between the ages of 50 and 80 who answered the poll, 43 percent of women in their 50s and early 60s said they had experienced urinary incontinence, as had 51 percent of those age 65 and over. Yet two-thirds of these women hadn’t talked to a doctor about the sometimes embarrassing, little-discussed issue. And only 38 percent said they do exercises that can strengthen the muscles that can help keep urine in. The poll shows they’re finding ways of coping on their own – from using pads or special underwear to wearing dark clothing and limiting fluid intake.  Read more.

Source: MHealth Lab, OCtober 31, 2018