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sleep woman

Nonpharmacologic Therapy Ups Sleep Quality in Women With Nocturia

Both tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) can improve sleep quality in women with nocturia, according to new study findings.  In a randomized trial, 40 women with self-reported nocturia were blindly assigned to transcutaneous electrical TNS or PFMT with behavioral therapy for 30 minutes each week for 3 months. PFMT inhibits detrusor contraction, and TNS eases lower urinary tract symptoms. Women with neurogenic bladder or on antimuscarinic or antidiuretic therapy were among the excluded patients.  Read more.

Source: Renal and Urology News, April 11, 2018

Peter Sayet Flow Control Device

Bluetooth-operated Bionic Sphincter Controller Close to Human Trial Phase

Most of us don’t have to give much thought to the mechanics of going to the bathroom.  Our bodies tell our brains when we have to go, and our brains tell our bodies when it’s acceptable to do so.  But millions of people with incontinence have to cope numerous times a day with the reality that the brain-to-body messaging they once took for granted will never operate normally again. In a small office building in Fort Lauderdale, inventor Peter H. Sayet says he’s close to marketing a device that will enable incontinence sufferers to regain control of their urinary functions. Sayet is president and CEO of Precision Medical Devices Inc., which he founded in 1998. In the past two decades, the company has secured nine patents and spent $5 million raised from about 200 investors through private-placement stock offerings to develop a Bluetooth-operated bionic sphincter controller, which he calls the Flow Control Device. Read more.

Source: Sun Sentinel, April 9, 2018

Bacteria

Charting an Underexplored Landscape: The Genitourinary Microbiome

More sensitive cultivation methods and precise 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques have revealed that the human bladder hosts a significant microbiome and those diverse bacteria inside the bladder impact pediatric urologic diseases.  As recently as one decade ago, the human bladder was thought to be a sterile landscape. In recent years that view has shifted radically, opening brand-new fields of research aimed at clarifying the role the microbiome plays in common urologic diseases that affect children, according to a review article published online Feb. 22, 2018, by Current Urology Reports. “There is a growing appreciation for the role of diverse bacteria in contributing to improved health as well as triggering disease processes or exacerbating illness,” says Michael H. Hsieh, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Clinic for Adolescent and Adult Pediatric Onset Urology (CAPITUL) at Children’s National Health System and study senior author. Read more.

Source: Medical Xpress, APril 5, 2018

mother post pregnancy

Stress Incontinence – A Hidden Disease Finds Some Light

While many of us have seen the ads for Attends, the problem being treated, urinary stress incontinence in women, is rarely mentioned [1]; and that is odd for a problem that by some reports effects 25% of women over age 25. (The incidence of breast cancer is about 12%). A recent article in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology sheds light on this somewhat unmentioned disease.  Urinary incontinence is the involuntary passing of urine, frequently associated with coughing, laughing or any activity that causes a person to bear down. It is a result of the loss of support for the bladder, rectum, and vagina – all the structures of the pelvis and is most often seen in women after childbirth. For all the beauty and miracles of birth, passing an eight-pound object through the vagina causes some wear and tear. But physicians know little about the natural history and progression of this loss of pelvic support (clinically termed prolapse). The study provides a better understanding of the course of the disease and some possible milestones. Read more.

Source: American Council on Science and Health, April 3, 2018

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

Urovant Starts Pursuit of Astellas’ Overactive Bladder Drug Myrbetriq with New Phase 3 Trial

A little later than expected, Roivant group company Urovant has started its confirmatory phase 3 program for overactive bladder (OAB) drug vibegron, originally licensed from Merck & Co.  The pivotal trial—which was originally expected to get underway last year—will involve around 1,400 adults with symptoms of OAB such as urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and urinary frequency, according to Urovant.  The drug already has positive phase 2b and phase 3 data in hand, so if the latest trial is positive Urovant should be able to move ahead with regulatory filings. If approved, it could become a direct competitor to Astellas’ Myrbetriq (mirabegron), the first beta3-adrenergic agonist to reach the market for OAB. And that could present a big commercial opportunity: Astellas reported sales of its drug rose 30% to 93.1 billion yen ($876 million) in the nine months to end-January 2018 with take-up driven by greater tolerability than the widely used antimuscarinic OAB drug class. Read more.

Source: Fierce Biotech, March 28, 2018

business buildings

Dignity In Incontinence? This Philly-area Start-up Thinks It Has the (Secret) Formula

Source: Philly.com, The Inquirer Daily News, March 22, 2018