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Triple W Launches DFree, First Wearable Device for Incontinence

Triple W, an innovator of connected health devices, today announced the U.S. launch of DFree®, the first wearable device for incontinence that notifies the user when it’s time to go to the bathroom. With DFree, seniors, children and disabled people with – bladder control issues have a convenient and cost-effective alternative to disposable diapers or pads and medications. DFree gives them freedom to live an active lifestyle with peace of mind from accidents. DFree has been used in over 500 senior care facilities in Japan and Europe since 2017. Triple W will showcase its new DFree device for consumer use at Medtrade, Georgia World Congress Center (Booth 2252), Oct. 16-17. Read more.

Source: PRWeb, October 16, 2018

stress urinary incontinence Polypropylene vaginal mesh

Boston Scientific Touts 3-year Solyx Stress Urinary Incontinence Mesh Trial Data

Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) this week released three-year data from a study of its Solyx single incision sling system intended to treat stress urinary incontinence, touting that the trial met all primary and secondary endpoints. Boston Scientific said it presented the full results from the trial yesterday at the annual scientific symposium of the American Urogynecologic Society. The Marlborough, Mass.-based company said it enrolled a total 281 patients in the trial at 21 sites looking to compare efficacy and adverse events for non-inferiority of the Solyx system versus the gold-standard transobturator mid-urethral sling procedure. The study was part of a post-market surveillance trial required by the FDA to be performed by all manufacturers of mesh products, Boston Scientific said. The company touted it as the first of three such studies it will complete, with remaining data expected to be released next year. Read more.

Source: Mass Device, October 12, 2018

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Health Declines Are More Rapid in Older Women with Urinary Incontinence

As women age, their ability to get around affects their quality of life. A new study shows that older women’s physical functioning declines more rapidly if they develop urinary incontinence, according to public health researchers at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Catherine Pirkle and Yan Yan Wu, both assistant professors in the Office of Public Health Studies in the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work, collaborated with researchers in Brazil, Colombia and Canada to recruit approximately 900 women in their sixties and seventies from those three countries plus Albania. About 25 percent of women over age 60 experience urinary incontinence. Study participants completed a short test of physical functioning, which included measuring the speed of their usual walking pace, checking their balance and testing how fast they could stand up from a chair. The women also completed a questionnaire about their health, which included a query about whether they had experienced any leakage of urine in the past week. After two years, the women repeated the physical functioning test. Read more.

Source: University of Hawai’i News, October 11, 2018

stress urinary incontinence Polypropylene vaginal mesh

Mesh ‘Last Option’ for Incontinence

Women who need treatment for urinary incontinence should only be offered mesh surgery as a last resort, new draft guidelines for the NHS advise. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) says non-surgical options, like pelvic muscle exercises, are the first to turn to. The NHS in England has already put restrictions on mesh operations after safety concerns. Many women say the implants cause agony by cutting into tissue. It is estimated that more than 100,000 UK women have had a mesh fitted. The net-like fabric can be attached into the wall of the vagina to act as a scaffold to support organs, such as the bladder, to keep them in the right place to help manage incontinence or another condition called prolapse.  Read more.

Source: BBC News, October 9, 2018

fiber rich diet for bowel retraining

FODMAP Diet Helps Fecal Incontinence

Two-thirds of patients with fecal incontinence associated with loose stool experienced an improvement in symptoms when following a low FODMAP diet, a researcher reported here. “Fecal incontinence is an underappreciated complaint, and patients often suffer in silence,” said Stacy Menees, MD, of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, in a presidential plenary session at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG).  In an earlier, large population-based study of more than 71,000 people, one in seven reported having had fecal incontinence at some point in their lives. Of these, one-third reported fecal incontinence in the last 7 days, which is often associated with diarrhea and loose stool. People with diarrhea have a 5.6-fold higher risk of fecal incontinence, and people with urgency have a more than 8-fold risk of diarrhea. “So if we are going to help people with fecal incontinence, the key is to concentrate on their stool consistency,” Menees said. Read more.

Source: MedPage Today, October 8, 2018

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

Kyorin Receives Approval from Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for Vibegron for Overactive Bladder

Urovant Sciences, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing novel therapies for urologic conditions, today announced that Kyorin Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. (Kyorin) received marketing approval from Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for vibegron for the treatment of adults with overactive bladder (OAB) in Japan.  Kyorin licensed vibegron for Japan from Merck & Co., Inc. in 2014, and later expanded the license to include certain other Asian countries in 2017. Urovant licensed rights to vibegron for the United States and the rest of the world from Merck, Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. in 2017 and subsequently entered into a collaboration agreement with Kyorin later that year. Under the collaboration agreement, Urovant and Kyorin share information related to the development of vibegron, including clinical trial and nonclinical study data. Read more.

Source: The News, October 1, 2018