Share

Latest Research, Industry, Medical and Scientific News

business buildings

Axonics® Announces Publication of ARTISAN Clinical Study Results in the Journal of Urology

Axonics Modulation Technologies, Inc. (AXNX) a medical technology company focused on the development and commercialization of novel implantable Sacral Neuromodulation (“SNM”) devices for the treatment of urinary and bowel dysfunction, today announced the results from its ARTISAN-SNM study were published online in the peer-reviewed Journal of Urology (https://doi.org/10.1097/JU.0000000000000458).  This is the first journal publication to detail outcomes for patients in the United States treated with a rechargeable sacral neuromodulation system. The study, conducted under a U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Investigational Device Exemption (“IDE”), found that 90% of all implanted patients with the Axonics r-SNM® System had successful therapy outcomes. Read more.

Source: Business Wire, July 29, 2019

TARIS Announces Presentation of Clinical Data for TAR-302 for Overactive Bladder

TARIS Bio™, a biopharmaceutical company developing transformational therapies to treat people with debilitating urological disorders, announced today that results of the company’s Phase 1b study of TAR-302 for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) will be presented in a podium session on Wednesday, September 4th at the Annual Meeting of the International Continence Society (ICS) in Gothenburg, Sweden. The presentation will detail the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and preliminary efficacy data including a durable benefit of TAR-302, which was administered to 11 OAB patients for six weeks. The abstract is available on the ICS website. Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, July 25, 2019

exercise women

FemTech – Making strides for women

While EU Member States discuss the Health Technology Assessment proposal, an EU-wide research tool to support decision-making on health technologies and innovation in the “FemTech” sector (encompassing fertility, pregnancy and nursing care, women’s sexual wellness and e-health technologies) promises to revolutionise the treatment of pelvic floor dysfunctions for women across Europe and beyond.  Over 50 percent of women worldwide suffer from at least one of the following three pelvic floor dysfunctions: Stress urinary incontinence, faecal incontinence, and pelvic organ prolapse (POP).  Read more.

Source: The Parliament, July 23, 2019

pelvic vaginal mesh stress urinary incontinence Polypropylene vaginal mesh

Study Shows Advantages for Stress Urinary Incontinence Surgery

One of the most commonly performed surgeries to treat stress urinary incontinence in women may have better long-term results than another common surgical technique, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic researchers.  The retrospective study of more than 1,800 cases at Mayo Clinic from 2002 to 2012 found that the need for additional surgery was twice as high after a transobturator sling surgery compared with a retropubic sling procedure. Reoperation rates within eight years after surgery were 11.2 percent for patients in the transobturator group compared with 5.2 percent in the retropubic group, according to the study, which will be published in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology in August. Read more.

Source: Austin Daily Herald, July 16, 2019

e. coli bacteria

Urinary Tract Infections Affect Millions. The Cures Are Faltering

For generations, urinary tract infections, one of the world’s most common ailments, have been easily and quickly cured with a simple course of antibiotics. But there is growing evidence that the infections, which afflict millions of Americans a year, mostly women, are increasingly resistant to these medicines, turning a once-routine diagnosis into one that is leading to more hospitalizations, graver illnesses and prolonged discomfort from the excruciating burning sensation that the infection brings. The New York City Department of Health has become so concerned about drug-resistant U.T.I.s, as they are widely known, that it introduced a new mobile phone app this month that gives doctors and nurses access to a list of strains of urinary tract infections and which drugs they are resistant to. Read more.

Source: New York Times, July 13, 2019

imaging brain head

Deep Brain Stimulation May Ease Some of Common Urinary Problems in Parkinson’s Patients, Study Reports

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) can help to alleviate some urinary symptoms — such as urinary frequency, urgency, and incontinence — in Parkinson’s patients, and is particularly helpful to women, a large study reports. The study, “Clinical study of the effects of deep brain stimulation on urinary dysfunctions in patients with Parkinson’s disease,” was published in Clinical Intervention in Aging. DBS involves a surgical procedure in which very fine wires are inserted into the brain to electrically stimulate areas responsible for movement control and, in this way, adjust neuronal activity within those brain regions. This treatment approach is indicated for Parkinson’s patients whose motor symptoms do not respond well to commonly used parkinsonian medications. Read more.

Source: Parkinson’s News Today, July 2, 2019