Florence Italy ICS 2017

GTx Announces Positive Results from Enobosarm Phase 2 Clinical Trial

GTx, Inc. (Nasdaq: GTXI) today announced top-line clinical trial results demonstrating that a daily dose of enobosarm 3 mg (GTx-024) substantially improved stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women, as well as related quality of life measurements. In this open-label clinical trial, all 17 patients completing 12 weeks of treatment saw a clinically significant reduction (50 percent or greater) in stress leaks per day, compared to baseline. Mean stress leaks decreased by 83 percent from baseline over 12 weeks, and the reductions in daily stress leaks following completion of treatment have been sustained as patients are being followed for up to 7 months post-treatment to assess the durability of treatment effect. No patient has relapsed to her baseline levels. These results were presented at the International Continence Society (ICS) Annual Meeting currently being held in Florence, Italy from September 12-15, 2017. Read more.

Source: Business Wire, September 13, 2017

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Uromedica Wins CMS Coverage for ProAct Continence Therapy Device

Uromedica said today it won a reimbursement code from the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services for its ProAct adjustable continence therapy for men, and that it launched the device in the US.  The ProAct system has FDA approval and is indicated for treating adult men with stress incontinence from intrinsic sphincter deficiency of at least 12 months following radical prostatectomy or TURP who have failed ot respond to conservative therapy, the Plymouth, Minn.-based company said. “The issuance of these codes will allow Uromedica to deliver its safe and effective therapy to improve the quality of life for men struggling with Stress Urinary Incontinence,” prez & CEO Tim Cook said in a press release. Read more.

Source: MassDevice Today, July 12, 2017

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What You Need to Know to Put the Brakes on USI

Urinary stress incontinence (USI) affects 25 per cent of women over 40 with the incidence increasing with age. It’s defined as a loss of urine often with cough, sneeze, laughing, running or lifting. Yet despite the prevalence of this condition, many women do not seek help until symptoms become severe and have been ongoing for at least two years.  Factors contributing to USI are childbirth, pregnancy, menopause, low back pain, weight gain and smoking. USI responds well to conservative non-surgical treatment with the first line of treatment often being pelvic floor strengthening exercises under the supervision of a physiotherapist. Physiotherapists often use biofeedback and electrical stimulation to help reeducate these muscles. Read more.

Source: The Chronicle Herald, February 8, 2017