Intractable Urinary Incontinence Despite Treatments and Surgeries

My Story – Submitted by: Marguerite

I have suffered from intractable urinary incontinence for 20 years with many treatments and no success.   I have undergone the so-called gold standard Burch Procedure surgery during which time I acquired Clostridium difficile in the hospital.  I have had vaginal mesh surgery. I have  tried Medtronic’s Interstim implant in my buttocks to stimulate my sacral nerve (which later was removed as no longer functioning) and have had several infusions of botox in my bladder. I have had cocktails injected to treat (non existent) interstitial cystitis and now I rely on self-catheterization to Continue reading

depression elderly nursing home

Loss of Control: Exploring the Links Between Falls and Incontinence

It might seem odd to some that resident falls and incontinence would be mentioned in the same breath. It actually can be difficult to estimate the extent to which one causes the other.  Yet, as clinical detectives have discovered, both subjects have a way of winding up in the same discussions. It all relates to the dangers for those residents who have lost control of their bodies in one or more ways. Emerging research and technology are growing closer to uncovering major underlying issues that could lead to reductions of incontinence and falls. As a result, they’re instilling hope for a better quality of life for millions of seniors. Read more.

Source: McKnight’s Long-Term Care News, March  8, 2018

catheter coating research

Incontinence Affects More Than 200m People Worldwide, So Why Isn’t More Being Done to Find a Cure?

For a chronic health condition that causes shame and misery for countless people and costs billions, urinary incontinence keeps a low profile.  Media reports about chronic health conditions appear with alarming regularity, but it is rare to read about the debilitating impact of the involuntary leakage of urine. Nevertheless, urinary incontinence is a condition which, next to Alzheimer’s or strokes, is reported as most negatively affecting “health-related quality of life”.  The reasons for this are not too hard to fathom. Urinary incontinence, of course, elicits some embarrassment. And there also seems to be a feeling this is a low priority condition: urinary incontinence does not directly bear up against the terrible impacts of life threatening conditions and illnesses. Read more.

Source: The Conversation, February 14, 2018

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

Urinary Incontinence: What Pharmacists Should Know

Urinary incontinence (UI), the involuntary leakage of urine, is a frequent and problematic chronic condition for many patients. An estimated 10 to 30% of men and women are affected nationally, though this may be underestimated due to underdiagnoses and undertreatment.1-3 Often, patients who suffer with UI symptoms will develop poor self-rated health, depression, and mobility disability.4,5 This comorbid disease state also presents a substantial financial burden; data from 2014 found that in the United States alone, an estimated $65.9 billion in direct and indirect costs were spent for UI treatment.3  Read more.

Source: Drug Topics, January 23, 2018

meeting conference

Report from NIA-Sponsored Conference Asks: What Don’t We Know About Bladder Control?

Nearly 40 percent of older women and up to 35 percent of older men live with distressing urinary symptoms, including difficulty with bladder control and urinating (sometimes known as “voiding”), which often compromise quality of life and overall health. The lack of truly effective and safe therapies for these challenges stems from insufficient knowledge of the biological mechanisms for urinary control, the impact of aging and disease on urinary control, and the relationships of symptoms to urinary health and overall well-being, so say researchers reporting on a prestigious conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and funded by a grant from the National Institute of Aging (NIA) to George A. Kuchel, MD, FRCP, AGSF, Director of the UConn Center on Aging and Travelers Chair in Geriatrics and Gerontology at UConn Health.  Read more. 

Source: Medical Xpress, December 4, 2017

woman India

Friends Adult Diapers Flags Off Its First Ad Campaign

With the campaign, Friends Adults Diapers aims is to blow the lid off the issue and show how liberating life can be again for a senior who is homebound due to incontinence.  Adult Incontinence is considered a taboo across in India, it is brushed away under the carpet and ignored like it doesn’t exist. The brand has launched the country’s first ever campaign for the category, bringing the spotlight on the subject, in a unique light-hearted manner that’s bound to resonate with people across the country.  With the campaign, Friends Adults Diapers aims is to blow the lid off the issue and show how liberating life can be again for a senior who is homebound due to incontinence; how one product can bring about a life-altering change in the lives of our elders and how accepting the problem and its solution can leave the senior citizens with happiness and freedom in the last leg of their lives.  Read more.

Source: ETBrandEquity.com, November 24, 2017

improve incontinence

New Report Indicates No Evidence AHT Pelvic Exercise Works

Abdominal hypopressive technique (AHT), an exercise method widely touted for 20 years as a way of controlling bladder leakage and pelvic organ prolapse, doesn’t work, according to a new report.  AHT is a breathing exercise developed in the 1980s by Belgian physiotherapist Marcel Caufriez. Highly popular, it is taught by more than 1500 practitioners in 14 countries, including in Australia.  But a report published last week in the British Journal of Sports Medicine finds no scientific evidence to support the claimed benefits of AHT.  Authors Kari Bo, of the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, in Oslo, and Saul Martín-Rodríguez, of the College of Physical Education, in Las Palmas, Spain, acknowledge the “worldwide huge interest” in AHT but say it “lacks scientific evidence to support its benefits. At this stage, AHT is based on a theory with 20 years of clinical practice.” Read more.

Source: Cosmos Magazine, October 18, 2017

scleroderma

Certain Systemic Sclerosis Patients at Higher Risk of Urinary Incontinence

Urinary symptoms are frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), especially in patients with limited cutaneous SSc, which have a 2.2 times higher risk of developing urinary symptoms than other SSc patients, and in patients who are positive for anti-centromere antibodies, who have a 2.8 times increased risk.  Findings from the European multicenter study, “The limited cutaneous form of systemic sclerosis is associated with urinary incontinence: an international multicentre study,” appeared in a recent issue of the journal Rheumatology.   The study (NCT01971294) enrolled a total of 334 patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis from five centers in France, Italy, and Switzerland. All patients responded to questionnaires to assess urinary incontinence and its impact on their quality of life. Read more.

Source: Scleroderma News, October 10, 2017

bladder retraining timed intervals

Hatch Medical to Broker Innovative Male Urinary Incontinence Device

Hatch Medical, L.L.C., a medical device incubator and technology brokerage firm, announced today that it has entered into an agreement with MUCOM, L.L.C. to broker the sale or license of its patented male urinary incontinence device MUI Comfort™. MUI Comfort™ is an integrated external collection system that meets the needs of a growing demographic that is coping with the consequences of stress, urge, and overflow incontinence. This innovative technology is differentiated from competing products by providing a complete solution that addresses both functional and psychological aspects associated with male urinary incontinence.  Read more.

Source: Yahoo Finance! February 16, 2017

hormones change as women age

When Bathroom Runs Rule the Day (and Night)

I have only one regret about not having been born a male, and it concerns plumbing, namely how easy it is for men to eliminate liquid waste,  whether by avoiding long bathroom lines or being able to relieve themselves discreetly when no facility is available.  My male envy grew after I contracted poison ivy on unmentionable parts when nature called during a hike in the woods. Urination has long been a vexing problem for women.  Read more.

Source: New York Times, December 12, 2016