improve incontinence

New Report Indicates No Evidence AHT Pelvic Exercise Works

Abdominal hypopressive technique (AHT), an exercise method widely touted for 20 years as a way of controlling bladder leakage and pelvic organ prolapse, doesn’t work, according to a new report.  AHT is a breathing exercise developed in the 1980s by Belgian physiotherapist Marcel Caufriez. Highly popular, it is taught by more than 1500 practitioners in 14 countries, including in Australia.  But a report published last week in the British Journal of Sports Medicine finds no scientific evidence to support the claimed benefits of AHT.  Authors Kari Bo, of the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, in Oslo, and Saul Martín-Rodríguez, of the College of Physical Education, in Las Palmas, Spain, acknowledge the “worldwide huge interest” in AHT but say it “lacks scientific evidence to support its benefits. At this stage, AHT is based on a theory with 20 years of clinical practice.” Read more.

Source: Cosmos Magazine, October 18, 2017

scleroderma

Certain Systemic Sclerosis Patients at Higher Risk of Urinary Incontinence

Urinary symptoms are frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), especially in patients with limited cutaneous SSc, which have a 2.2 times higher risk of developing urinary symptoms than other SSc patients, and in patients who are positive for anti-centromere antibodies, who have a 2.8 times increased risk.  Findings from the European multicenter study, “The limited cutaneous form of systemic sclerosis is associated with urinary incontinence: an international multicentre study,” appeared in a recent issue of the journal Rheumatology.   The study (NCT01971294) enrolled a total of 334 patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis from five centers in France, Italy, and Switzerland. All patients responded to questionnaires to assess urinary incontinence and its impact on their quality of life. Read more.

Source: Scleroderma News, October 10, 2017

bladder retraining timed intervals

Hatch Medical to Broker Innovative Male Urinary Incontinence Device

Hatch Medical, L.L.C., a medical device incubator and technology brokerage firm, announced today that it has entered into an agreement with MUCOM, L.L.C. to broker the sale or license of its patented male urinary incontinence device MUI Comfort™. MUI Comfort™ is an integrated external collection system that meets the needs of a growing demographic that is coping with the consequences of stress, urge, and overflow incontinence. This innovative technology is differentiated from competing products by providing a complete solution that addresses both functional and psychological aspects associated with male urinary incontinence.  Read more.

Source: Yahoo Finance! February 16, 2017

hormones change as women age

When Bathroom Runs Rule the Day (and Night)

I have only one regret about not having been born a male, and it concerns plumbing, namely how easy it is for men to eliminate liquid waste,  whether by avoiding long bathroom lines or being able to relieve themselves discreetly when no facility is available.  My male envy grew after I contracted poison ivy on unmentionable parts when nature called during a hike in the woods. Urination has long been a vexing problem for women.  Read more.

Source: New York Times, December 12, 2016

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

Innovus Pharma Launches its Clinically Proven UriVarx™ Product for Bladder Health in the United States

Innovus Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“Innovus Pharma”) (OTCQB Venture Market: INNV), an emerging commercial-stage pharmaceutical company that delivers safe, innovative and effective over-the-counter medicine and consumer care products to improve men’s and women’s health and respiratory diseases, today announced the launch of UriVarx™ in the U.S. UriVarx™ is clinically proven to reduce urinary urgency, accidents and both day and night frequency in Overactive Bladder (“OAB”) and Urinary Incontinence (“UI”) patients.  Read more.

Source: BusinessWire, December 1, 2016

New Beginnings After Incontinence

My Story – Submitted by: Gene

My name is Gene and I’m a 52 year old male. About 5 years ago I began to slowly lose control over my bladder due to a small bladder tumor. After having the tumor removed I found myself incontinent.

Being incontinent and trying to return to school or work seemed impossible for me at first. After my surgery I wasn’t able to return to my old job. Managing my problem at home was hard enough, but at work or school — no way!! There seemed to be little info available out there about practical day to day management. So I thought that this letter might help those out there that also find themselves at this point.Continue reading

silence

Depend Finds British Women are Living with a Silent Secret

A staggering 10 million British women experience incontinence; almost two-thirds (64%) find it difficult to talk about, and almost one in five (19%) admit they haven’t spoken to anyone about it. As a result, people are left with an incorrect perception of incontinence – with two-thirds (66%) of women surveyed with incontinence not identifying with their condition. This means women delay the move to incontinence underwear with 43% not using any products at all. Sadly, this results in giving up doing activities they love. Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, October 27, 2016

Exercises Targeting Trunk Muscles May Improve CF Urinary Incontinence

In a recent symposium, scientists discussed the increased importance of physical therapy in addressing cystic fibrosis-associated muscle impairments and urinary incontinence.  The presentation, titled “Posture, Pelvic Floor & Pistons: A Look Beyond ‘Kegels’ to Treat Urinary Incontinence,” was given today at the Symposium “Growing Older With CF” at the 30th Annual North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference (NACFC) Oct. 27-29 in Orlando, Florida.  Read more.

Source: Cystic Fibrosis News Today, October 27, 2016

Bacteria

Weethinking the Role of Bacteria in Urinary Incontinence

We all know that feeling of suddenly needing to pee, and the agonizing worry that we might not find a toilet in time or make it that far. Sadly, for many people this is a regular occurrence and wetting themselves uncontrollably is an inevitable consequence.  Almost 1 in 5 women over the age of 44 suffer from what is known as Urgency Urinary Incontinence (UUI): experiencing a strong sensation of an urgent need to pee, followed by immediate leakage of a large volume of urine. It can severely adversely affect someone’s life, contributing to anxiety, depression and social isolation. Read more.

Source: EurekAlerts, October 7, 2016