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Uromedica Wins CMS Coverage for ProAct Continence Therapy Device

Uromedica said today it won a reimbursement code from the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services for its ProAct adjustable continence therapy for men, and that it launched the device in the US.  The ProAct system has FDA approval and is indicated for treating adult men with stress incontinence from intrinsic sphincter deficiency of at least 12 months following radical prostatectomy or TURP who have failed ot respond to conservative therapy, the Plymouth, Minn.-based company said. “The issuance of these codes will allow Uromedica to deliver its safe and effective therapy to improve the quality of life for men struggling with Stress Urinary Incontinence,” prez & CEO Tim Cook said in a press release. Read more.

Source: MassDevice Today, July 12, 2017

Acupuncture

Consider Acupuncture for Incontinence

Acupuncture, a 3,000-year-old healing technique, received mixed reviews in two new studies from China — one focusing on incontinence and the other on a cause of female infertility.  A research team found acupuncture did improve symptoms of stress incontinence — an involuntarily loss of urine, such as when a woman sneezes or coughs.  But in a separate study, another team of researchers determined that acupuncture did not help women who were infertile because of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women with PCOS have a hormonal imbalance that keeps them from releasing an egg (ovulating) during the menstrual cycle. Read more.

Source: HealthDay News, June 27, 2017

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

GTx Announces Preliminary Results with Enobosarm

GTx, Inc. (Nasdaq: GTXI) today announced release of preliminary clinical data from its ongoing, open-label, Phase 2 clinical trial of enobosarm 3 mg (GTx-024) in postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). An abstract entitled “Kegels In A Bottle”: Preliminary Results Of A Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator (GTx-024) For The Treatment Of SUI In Post-Menopausal Women, summarizing clinical data from the first seven patients completing 12 weeks of treatment with enobosarm, is now available on the International Continence Society’s website. This proof-of-concept clinical trial is the first of its kind to evaluate an orally-administered selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) for SUI. Read more.

Source: BusinessWire, June 12, 2017

women friends

Low Estrogen May Contribute to Incontinence in Women

Significantly lower levels of oestrogen in peri-menopausal and post-menopausal women could increase their risk of stress urinary incontinence, according to Austrian researchers.  They noted that sex steroid levels changed markedly during menopause, and oestrogen deficiency after menopause caused changes within the urogenital tract.  Their study included 47 women with stress urinary incontinence who were matched with 47 controls.  The findings suggested that low levels of circulating sex steroids might have a negative impact on the function of the lower urinary tract and on mechanisms involved with continence.  Read more.

Nursing Times, June 8, 2017

Acupuncture

Acupuncture Stops Urinary Bladder Leakage Over Drugs

Acupuncture outperforms drug therapy for the treatment of mild to moderate female stress urinary incontinence (FSUI). Researchers from Weihai City Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine conclude that electroacupuncture is effective for the control of FSUI. In the study, an electroacupuncture treatment group produced a positive patient outcome rate of 86.7%. The drug control group produced a 68.9% positive patient outcome rate for the treatment of FSUI. The electroacupuncture group had a significantly higher complete recovery rate and total effective rate. Read more.

Source: Health CMi, May 9, 2017

doctor and patient

Trendlines Gets Grant for Urinary Incontinence Device

Trendlines Labs is to receive a grant from the Singapore Israel Industrial Research and Development Foundation for the development and clinical trial of its stress urinary incontinence (SUI) product, which is being developed in partnership with the Singapore General Hospital.  The 50 women in the trial, expected to start mid-2017 at the hospital, will provide feedback on the product. The foundation will provide up to 50 percent of the $400,000 the partners need to fund the final product development and clinical trial.  Trendlines Labs, the innovation arm of The Trendlines Group Ltd., the Israeli venture fund and tech accelerator firm, has developed a nonsurgical, non-pharmaceutical solution to mitigate SUI, a form of incontinence that affects approximately 15 million women in the US alone, according to the Women’s Health Foundation. SUI is caused by weak sphincter muscles or weak pelvic floors, and can occur when there is abdominal stress on the pelvic organs — the bladder, vagina, uterus, or rectum. Read more.

Source: Times of Israel, April 3, 2017

Apple iPhone

New System Uses Remote Medical Monitoring, Mobile Games to Improve At-Home Pelvic Floor Muscle Training

Urinary incontinence is any involuntary urine leakage. It is a condition that can be more or less severe and it affects one in three women of all ages, which is more than 56 million people in Europe and more than 350 million people in the world. It is not a normal part of ageing and has a negative impact on the quality of life of the women who suffer from it. The main risk factors for urinary incontinence are pregnancy and childbirth, overweight and obesity, and high-impact sports. There are several treatments to improve or cure its symptoms, depending on the type of incontinence, and it can also be prevented by taking measures before it appears.  One approach that has proven effective in preventing and treating stress urinary incontinence is pelvic floor muscle training. It consists of a programme of contraction and relaxation exercises for the muscles that form the base of the pelvis. If the treatment is followed and performed correctly with the supervision of a therapist, the rate of cure/improvement may reach 70% .Read more.

Source: News-Medical.net, March 9, 2017

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Strong Muscles Tied to Lower Risk of Incontinence in Older Women

Women who have more lean muscle mass or better grip strength may be less likely to experience a common type of urinary incontinence, a study suggests.  That’s because strong muscles may help counter what’s known as stress urinary incontinence, which happens when the pelvic floor muscles supporting the bladder are too weak to prevent urine leaks when people do things like cough, sneeze or exercise. Childbirth is a common reason for weak pelvic muscles, and obesity makes the problem worse. Read more.

Source: WHBL, December 15, 2016

medical research

Cytori Pivotal ADRESU Incontinence Trial Hits 50% Enrollment Milestone

Cytori Therapeutics, Inc. (CYTX) today announced that over half of 45 patients in the ADRESU trial in Japan have been enrolled and treated. ADRESU is a late phase, investigator-initiated Japanese clinical trial to study the efficacy and safety of Cytori Cell TherapyTM in men with stress urinary incontinence after prostatic intervention for prostate cancer or benign prostatic hypertrophy. Read more.

Source: Yahoo! Finance, December 14, 2016

hormones change as women age

When Bathroom Runs Rule the Day (and Night)

I have only one regret about not having been born a male, and it concerns plumbing, namely how easy it is for men to eliminate liquid waste,  whether by avoiding long bathroom lines or being able to relieve themselves discreetly when no facility is available.  My male envy grew after I contracted poison ivy on unmentionable parts when nature called during a hike in the woods. Urination has long been a vexing problem for women.  Read more.

Source: New York Times, December 12, 2016