drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

U.S. FDA Accepts for Review Astellas sNDA for Mirabegron

Astellas Pharma Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted for review a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) that seeks approval for the use of mirabegron in combination with solifenacin succinate 5 mg for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and urinary frequency. The anticipated Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) goal date for a decision by the FDA is April 28, 2018. In the United States, mirabegron and solifenacin succinate are marketed as Myrbetriq® and VESIcare®, respectively. Each is approved by the FDA as a monotherapy for the treatment of OAB with symptoms of urge urinary continence, urgency and urinary frequency. Read more.

Source: Gurufocus.com, September 12, 2017

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Astellas Submits Supplemental New Drug Application for Mirabegron

Astellas Pharma Inc. (TSE: 4503, President and CEO: Yoshihiko Hatanaka, “Astellas”) announced today the submission of a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seeking approval for the use of mirabegron in combination with solifenacin succinate 5 mg for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency and urinary frequency. In the United States, mirabegron and solifenacin succinate are marketed as Myrbetriq® and VESIcare®, respectively. Each is approved by the FDA as a monotherapy for the treatment of OAB with symptoms of urge urinary continence, urgency and urinary frequency.  Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, June 29, 2017

Prescription Drugs for Overactive Bladder (OAB)

drugs for overactive bladder (OAB)

There are several prescription drugs for overactive bladder (OAB).

The FDA approved medications, or drugs, currently available on the U.S. market for the treatment of urinary incontinence are for a specific condition called overactive bladder (OAB). Some are also used for OAB with urge urinary incontinence (UUI). You may have seen advertisements on television or in magazines for these medications. Most of the prescription drugs for OAB partially calm the bladder muscles that cause abnormal contractions, thereby reducing the frequency and severity of the overwhelming urge to urinate. Some of these drugs may also increase the bladder’s capacity to hold urine and delay the initial urge to void. This class of drugs is referred to as antimuscarinics.

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