operating room

Majority of Incontinence Treatments Deliver Poor Results

Surgery is the most reliable method of treatment for incontinence – curing the condition in just over eight in ten cases; other types of treatment, meanwhile, do not deliver the same kind of success. These are the findings of a comprehensive systematic overview of cure rates for the treatment of incontinence around the world during the last ten years. “Unfortunately we are not actually curing the condition in that many cases. Surgery aside, the results delivered are poor. And the problems are only going to get worse in the future because the population, as we know, is aging,” says Ian Milsom, Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the Sahlgrenska Academy and Head of the Gothenburg Continence Research Center (GCRC). Read more.

Source: Science Daily, April 4, 2017

New Beginnings After Incontinence

My Story – Submitted by: Gene

My name is Gene and I’m a 52 year old male. About 5 years ago I began to slowly lose control over my bladder due to a small bladder tumor. After having the tumor removed I found myself incontinent.

Being incontinent and trying to return to school or work seemed impossible for me at first. After my surgery I wasn’t able to return to my old job. Managing my problem at home was hard enough, but at work or school — no way!! There seemed to be little info available out there about practical day to day management. So I thought that this letter might help those out there that also find themselves at this point.Continue reading

The Simon Foundation for Continence Announces Its New Book, Managing Life with Incontinence

Managing Life with Incontinence

Managing Life with Incontinence

Chicago, IL, May 16, 2012 –(PR.com)– The Simon Foundation for Continence announces the publication of its unique new book, Managing Life with Incontinence. Written specifically for individuals who live day to day with bladder and/or bowel incontinence, Managing Life with Incontinence also provides information that will be useful for physicians and nurses who understand their patients’ frustrations and wish to more fully comprehend the quality of life issues facing people with intractable incontinence.Continue reading