doctor and patient

Incontinence Tied to Low Testosterone in Women

A possible link between low levels of testosterone in women and urinary incontinence raises the possibility that testosterone replacement therapy might help, results from a new study suggest.  “Testosterone may prevent pelvic floor atrophy, thereby reducing the risk of urinary incontinence,” said investigator Michelle Kim, MD, PhD, from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.  Levator ani muscles are known to have androgen receptors. In one rodent model, testosterone administered after surgically induced urinary incontinence resulted in levator hypertrophy (Int Urol Nephrol. 2011;43:1003-1008).  Because it is unclear whether the same association exists in humans, Dr Kim and her colleagues were prompted to assess the correlation between testosterone and incontinence. Read more.

Source: Medscape, May 18, 2017

Acupuncture

Acupuncture Stops Urinary Bladder Leakage Over Drugs

Acupuncture outperforms drug therapy for the treatment of mild to moderate female stress urinary incontinence (FSUI). Researchers from Weihai City Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine conclude that electroacupuncture is effective for the control of FSUI. In the study, an electroacupuncture treatment group produced a positive patient outcome rate of 86.7%. The drug control group produced a 68.9% positive patient outcome rate for the treatment of FSUI. The electroacupuncture group had a significantly higher complete recovery rate and total effective rate. Read more.

Source: Health CMi, May 9, 2017

P&G Partners with Walmart Around Raising Awareness on Common Issue

In order to help normalize the topic of bladder leaks, Always Discreet is working with retailers to educate women nationwide. As an example, Procter & Gamble’s Always Discreet brand on Thursday worked with Walmart to launch a new, inspirational video to help women understand how common bladder leaks are and to rethink their negative feelings.  “Because many women avoid talking about their bladder leaks, they can often feel alone in their experience, embarrassed to bring up the topic, and hesitant to shop for and wear incontinence products,” stated Barbara Hannah Grufferman, positive living expert, author and Always Discreet spokesperson. “Over the years, I’ve spoken to thousands of women around the country who have bladder leaks, and most women don’t realize how common and normal it is. The good news is that once women realize how many other women experience it too, they feel better about it and themselves,” she said. “That’s what’s been captured in this video, and the hope is that women watch it, make that connection for themselves and feel more confident, empowered and compelled to live their best lives and stand in solidarity with the many other women who experience bladder leaks too.” Read more.

Source: Drug Store News, May 4, 2017

doctor and patient

Trendlines Gets Grant for Urinary Incontinence Device

Trendlines Labs is to receive a grant from the Singapore Israel Industrial Research and Development Foundation for the development and clinical trial of its stress urinary incontinence (SUI) product, which is being developed in partnership with the Singapore General Hospital.  The 50 women in the trial, expected to start mid-2017 at the hospital, will provide feedback on the product. The foundation will provide up to 50 percent of the $400,000 the partners need to fund the final product development and clinical trial.  Trendlines Labs, the innovation arm of The Trendlines Group Ltd., the Israeli venture fund and tech accelerator firm, has developed a nonsurgical, non-pharmaceutical solution to mitigate SUI, a form of incontinence that affects approximately 15 million women in the US alone, according to the Women’s Health Foundation. SUI is caused by weak sphincter muscles or weak pelvic floors, and can occur when there is abdominal stress on the pelvic organs — the bladder, vagina, uterus, or rectum. Read more.

Source: Times of Israel, April 3, 2017

Apple iPhone

New System Uses Remote Medical Monitoring, Mobile Games to Improve At-Home Pelvic Floor Muscle Training

Urinary incontinence is any involuntary urine leakage. It is a condition that can be more or less severe and it affects one in three women of all ages, which is more than 56 million people in Europe and more than 350 million people in the world. It is not a normal part of ageing and has a negative impact on the quality of life of the women who suffer from it. The main risk factors for urinary incontinence are pregnancy and childbirth, overweight and obesity, and high-impact sports. There are several treatments to improve or cure its symptoms, depending on the type of incontinence, and it can also be prevented by taking measures before it appears.  One approach that has proven effective in preventing and treating stress urinary incontinence is pelvic floor muscle training. It consists of a programme of contraction and relaxation exercises for the muscles that form the base of the pelvis. If the treatment is followed and performed correctly with the supervision of a therapist, the rate of cure/improvement may reach 70% .Read more.

Source: News-Medical.net, March 9, 2017

hormones change as women age

When Bathroom Runs Rule the Day (and Night)

I have only one regret about not having been born a male, and it concerns plumbing, namely how easy it is for men to eliminate liquid waste,  whether by avoiding long bathroom lines or being able to relieve themselves discreetly when no facility is available.  My male envy grew after I contracted poison ivy on unmentionable parts when nature called during a hike in the woods. Urination has long been a vexing problem for women.  Read more.

Source: New York Times, December 12, 2016

pregnant woman birth childbirth

Women Who Have Not Given Birth Also Experience Urinary Incontinence, Study Finds

Women who have not given birth often end up under the radar for research on urinary incontinence. In a study of this group, however, one in five women over 45 years say they experience this type of incontinence.  “This confirms that problems are found in all groups, and that women have a weakness of the pelvic floor even if they have not previously given birth,” says Maria Gyhagen, gynecologist at Södra Älvsborg Hospital in Borås and researcher at Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University. Read more.

Source: News-Medical.net, November 9, 2016

female doctor

Too Few Female Urologists to Meet Aging Patients’ Demand

Women prefer to see female urologists, but there are far too few to meet a growing demand, a new study reports. Researchers analyzed patient data from 2003 to 2012 for more than 6,000 urologists across the United States. Women represented 54 percent of patients for female urologists, and 32 percent for male urologists, the study found. Of an estimated 9,600 U.S. urologists, between 8 percent and 12 percent are women, according to the study. Read more.

Source: HealthDay News, August 22, 2016

A Pessary for the Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women

pessary

A pessary may be used by a woman who is experiencing urinary incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse.

A pessary is a small device made of silicone, often shaped like a diaphragm or a cube, which is inserted into the vagina of a woman to help support her pelvic organs. Pessaries are used to treat pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence. Continue reading