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Latest Research, Industry, Medical and Scientific News

operating room

Majority of Incontinence Treatments Deliver Poor Results

Surgery is the most reliable method of treatment for incontinence – curing the condition in just over eight in ten cases; other types of treatment, meanwhile, do not deliver the same kind of success. These are the findings of a comprehensive systematic overview of cure rates for the treatment of incontinence around the world during the last ten years. “Unfortunately we are not actually curing the condition in that many cases. Surgery aside, the results delivered are poor. And the problems are only going to get worse in the future because the population, as we know, is aging,” says Ian Milsom, Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the Sahlgrenska Academy and Head of the Gothenburg Continence Research Center (GCRC). Read more.

Source: Science Daily, April 4, 2017

business buildings

Principle Business Enterprises, Inc. Acquires Absorbent Products Company, Inc.

Principle Business Enterprises (PBE), Inc., a technology leader in moisture management products, announces the acquisition of the business assets and operations of Absorbent Products Company, Inc. of Bowling Green, Ohio.  “The acquisition of APCI is consistent with our mission, by allowing us to enter new markets and expand our ability to provide the highest quality products and services to our customers and business partners,” says Chuck Stocking, Co-CEO of PBE. “APCI employs a technical workforce with skills that complement the current PBE team.  They also have valuable production machinery that is needed to fuel PBE’s current growth in the incontinence and personal care marketplace.”  Stocking adds “This acquisition is also great for Northwest Ohio because it keeps at least 35 jobs in the area that might otherwise be moved out of the state or possibly out of the country.” Read more.

Source: PRNewswire, April 4, 2017

doctor and patient

Trendlines Gets Grant for Urinary Incontinence Device

Trendlines Labs is to receive a grant from the Singapore Israel Industrial Research and Development Foundation for the development and clinical trial of its stress urinary incontinence (SUI) product, which is being developed in partnership with the Singapore General Hospital.  The 50 women in the trial, expected to start mid-2017 at the hospital, will provide feedback on the product. The foundation will provide up to 50 percent of the $400,000 the partners need to fund the final product development and clinical trial.  Trendlines Labs, the innovation arm of The Trendlines Group Ltd., the Israeli venture fund and tech accelerator firm, has developed a nonsurgical, non-pharmaceutical solution to mitigate SUI, a form of incontinence that affects approximately 15 million women in the US alone, according to the Women’s Health Foundation. SUI is caused by weak sphincter muscles or weak pelvic floors, and can occur when there is abdominal stress on the pelvic organs — the bladder, vagina, uterus, or rectum. Read more.

Source: Times of Israel, April 3, 2017

exercise

A Revolutionary Design in Pelvic Floor Weakness Treatment

It’s more common than hay fever, yet women just don’t talk about pelvic floor weakness, a condition resulting in intermittent urinary leakage. It affects one in three women in varying degrees of severity — 82% consider their symptoms severe, while 70% wear absorbent pads to deal with it. Yet, 68% of women never seek medical help. “Women are embarrassed. It’s called stress urinary incontinence and they associate the word ‘incontinence’ with old ladies being wet all the time,” says Dr Ruth Maher, an associate professor at the Department of Physical Therapy, Creighton University in Omaha. Maher is one of the original four inventors of recently launched innovotherapy, a non-invasive treatment for pelvic floor weakness. Innovotherapy directly targets pelvic floor weakness — the root cause of urinary leaks — unlike many other treatments which simply mask symptoms. Read more.

Source: The Irish Examiner, April 3, 2017

elderly underactive bladder symptoms needed to be reported

Drug Tied to Dementia Risk Overprescribed to Seniors: Study

A drug linked to a raised risk of dementia is taken by millions of older Americans who have an overactive bladder, researchers say.  More than one-quarter of patients with the urinary problem had been prescribed the drug oxybutynin (Ditropan), an international team of investigators found.  Yet, “oxybutynin is a particularly poor drug for overactive bladder in elderly patients,” said study lead author Dr. Daniel Pucheril, a urologist at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.  Prior studies have linked the drug to thinking problems and increased risk of dementia in older people, possibly because of the way it affects brain chemicals, he said.  “It’s a great and effective drug for younger patients, but is a risky drug for older patients,” Pucheril said. It boosts dementia risk even when not taken indefinitely, he said.  Alternatives exist but they’re more expensive and may not be covered by insurance, at least initially, the study authors explained.  Read more.

Source: HealthDay News, March 30, 2017

surgeons perform pelvic organ prolapse surgery

How a Ring of Titanium Beads Can Help Fecal Incontinence

A new device made up of magnetic titanium beads may help certain patients who have problems controlling their bowels, a condition called fecal incontinence.  The Fenix® Continence Restoration System mimics the function of the anal sphincter. It is the newest treatment option available to certain patients who have fecal incontinence caused by childbirth complications, trauma, prior surgeries, anal sex or another cause of muscle and nerve damage.  Read more.

Source: Cleveland Clinic, March 9, 2017