Research, Industry, Medical and Scientific News

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Below you will find news and press releases from industry, government, and academia regarding product developments and medical/scientific research news.

improve incontinence

New Report Indicates No Evidence AHT Pelvic Exercise Works

Abdominal hypopressive technique (AHT), an exercise method widely touted for 20 years as a way of controlling bladder leakage and pelvic organ prolapse, doesn’t work, according to a new report.  AHT is a breathing exercise developed in the 1980s by Belgian physiotherapist Marcel Caufriez. Highly popular, it is taught by more than 1500 practitioners in 14 countries, including in Australia.  But a report published last week in the British Journal of Sports Medicine finds no scientific evidence to support the claimed benefits of AHT.  Authors Kari Bo, of the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, in Oslo, and Saul Martín-Rodríguez, of the College of Physical Education, in Las Palmas, Spain, acknowledge the “worldwide huge interest” in AHT but say it “lacks scientific evidence to support its benefits. At this stage, AHT is based on a theory with 20 years of clinical practice.” Read more.

Source: Cosmos Magazine, October 18, 2017

national monument Scotland

Lib Dems call for Incontinence Prevention Training in Scotland

Midwives, health visitors and other health professionals should get specific training on incontinence prevention, as part of a new nationwide continence strategy in Scotland, according to the Liberal Democrats.  Scottish Liberal Democrat health spokesman Alex Cole-Hamilton, MPS for Edinburgh Western, said it was time to tackle taboos around the subject that can prevent sufferers seeking treatment. In a motion put to the Scottish parliament, he suggested a national continence strategy could help improve the quality of life of hundreds of thousands of people across the country. Read more.

Source: Nursing Times, October 13, 2017

scleroderma

Certain Systemic Sclerosis Patients at Higher Risk of Urinary Incontinence

Urinary symptoms are frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), especially in patients with limited cutaneous SSc, which have a 2.2 times higher risk of developing urinary symptoms than other SSc patients, and in patients who are positive for anti-centromere antibodies, who have a 2.8 times increased risk.  Findings from the European multicenter study, “The limited cutaneous form of systemic sclerosis is associated with urinary incontinence: an international multicentre study,” appeared in a recent issue of the journal Rheumatology.   The study (NCT01971294) enrolled a total of 334 patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis from five centers in France, Italy, and Switzerland. All patients responded to questionnaires to assess urinary incontinence and its impact on their quality of life. Read more.

Source: Scleroderma News, October 10, 2017

obese, obesity

Study Highlights Association of Obesity with Fecal Incontinence in Spina Bifida Patients

In the November 2017 issue of Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Dr. Charlène Brochard and her colleagues from a spina bifida referral center in Rennes, France, report on the frequency of intestinal problems in 26- to 45-year-old patients with spina bifida. The multidisciplinary study included clinical data obtained over a 9-year period on nearly 400 spina bifida patients, emphasizing the association of obesity with fecal incontinence and bowel dysfunction.  Read more.

Source: News-Medical. net, October 9, 2017

Continence NZ Marks 25 Years of Providing Support

Continence NZ is marking 25 years of providing support to the more than 1.1 million New Zealanders who live with bladder and bowel incontinence, by reminding affected Kiwis they don’t have to be embarrassed or suffer in silence.  September 24-October 1 is Continence NZ’s Awareness Week. Incredibly, bladder and/or bowel control problems affect more than 1.1 million New Zealanders over the age of 15, including 25 percent of younger women, 34 percent of older women and 22 percent of older men.  The impact on the physical and emotional health of people with incontinence issues can be significant and devastating, and is sadly often underestimated. Living with incontinence can feel humiliating, but Continence NZ is here to help. Read more.

Source: Scoop, September 29, 2017

surgeons perform pelvic organ prolapse surgery

TERREWODE Receives Funding to Serve Obstetric Fistula Patients

Women in Uganda suffering from obstetric fistula just received a million reasons to be hopeful.  Support from the Uganda Fistula Fund for TERREWODE, as well as the Hamlin International Partners in Australia and the United States, has raised over $1.6 million for TERREWODE, a non-governmental organization in East Uganda, which implements a community outreach program to provide surgical treatment and holistic education and empowerment for women with obstetric fistula. The funds will be used to build a specialized women’s hospital including a 30-bed fistula surgical block and a 30-bed social reintegration block in Soroti, Uganda, modeled after the renowned Hamlin Fistula Hospital in Ethiopia.  Read more.

Source: Life Pulse Health, September 28, 2017

surgeons perform pelvic organ prolapse surgery

First Patient in Malaysia Successfully Treated with Urolastic™

Urogyn B.V. and Leader Biomedical announce the first patient treated in Malaysia with Urolastic™– an innovative Urinary Stress Incontinence product that is exclusively offered by Leader Biomedical in India and APAC.  We are excited to announce that we have successfully introduced Urolastic™ in Malaysia and treated a female patient suffering from severe Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI). The patient suffered from the condition, as a result of birth deficiencies and was diagnosed with a short, yet very wide urethra. After previously undergoing a procedure using a bulking agent, the patient went down from using eight pads a day, to five pads a day. Treatment with Urolastic™ earlier this month by Dr. Warren Lo Hwa Loon at Pantai Hospital Kuala Lumpur has improved the patient’s condition, as a result of which she now only uses one pad a day, thus significantly improving her quality of life. Stress Urinary Incontinence is a disease affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Traditionally, SUI is treated with either a sling or injection of a bulking agent, where a sling procedure is an invasive procedure for the patient and the traditional bulking agents are expensive, as they are only effective for a short period and need to be repeated regularly. Read more.

Source: OpenPR, September 26, 2017