medical research

Magnets and MicroRNAs: A Therapeutic Duo That Could Help Relieve Constipation

It is fairly common to think of constipation in a humorous light. However, anyone who has suffered from the debilitating condition can attest that it is far from a laughing matter.  With a sizable percentage of the population increasing in age and opioid abuse reaching epidemic proportions, investigators are looking for new tools to help patients ease their gastrointestinal suffering. Now, investigators from Thomas Jefferson University (TJU) have just released data of a new technique—called magnetofection—that incorporates micro-metal beads coated with small RNA fragments (microRNAs, or miRNAs) injected at specific regions of the colon and held in place with a powerful magnet. Read more.

Source: Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News, January 17, 2018

sleep woman

Sleep Quality Improves with Help of Incontinence Drug

A drug used to curtail episodes of urinary incontinence in women also improves quality of sleep, a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine reports.  People who experience urinary incontinence, especially at night, often have trouble maintaining normal sleep cycles. Now, the Stanford researcher sees promise in using one drug to help remedy both problems.  “Two of the biggest quality-of-life factors for older women are poor sleep quality and incontinence, and the older you get, the more prevalent both conditions are, and they do seem to be correlated,” said Leslee Subak, MD, professor and chair of obstetrics and gynecology. “And so, if we can find a drug to treat one and effectively decrease the other too, that could be big for improving quality of life.”  Read more.

Source: Stanford Medicine News Center, January 11, 2018

You may also with to read:  Incontinence Drug May Help Sleep Dysfunction in Older Women

women friends

Elidah Welcomes the New Year with New Funding for Incontinence Therapy

Elidah (http://www.elidah.com) has received multiple awards for further development of its neuromuscular stimulation technology to treat incontinence. Elidah has received a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to continue development of its wearable device, Elitone, designed to treat urinary incontinence, a condition that affects one in three women. Additionally, the Defense Health Agency (DHA) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program in the Department of Defense (DoD) has awarded Elidah a contract to develop and adapt the Elitone technology for the treatment of injured Service members. These awards start in January 2018. Read more.

Source: NBHerard, January 9, 2018

CompactCath

CompactCath, a Discreet, Compact, Hygienic Urinary Catheter Cleared in EU

The San Francisco Bay Area may be best known for information technology startups, but there are other small companies around that develop very different technologies. CompactCath has created a urinary catheter that solves some of the persistent issues that users of such devices have to face every day, and the company just announced that its eponymous device received CE Mark approval in Europe. About a year ago the CompactCath received FDA clearance. Read more.

Source: Medgadget, December 13, 2017

women friends

USPSTF Recommends Against HT for Prevention of Chronic Conditions in Postmenopausal Women

Hormone therapies in menopausal women are associated with some beneficial effects, such as decreased risk for diabetes and fracture, but are also associated with increased risks for stroke, thromboembolic events, gallbladder disease and urinary incontinence, according to an evidence report and systematic review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.  In 2012, the USPSTF recommended against the use of HT for prevention of chronic conditions, and the current update continues to recommend against its use.  Read more.

Source: Healio, December 12, 2017

school pediatric health

Urinary Incontinence May Affect Learning and Academic Performance of Teenagers

Continence problems are among the most common pediatric health problems. It’s commonly believed that continence problems resolve with age in all children.  However, severe incontinence in childhood can persist into adolescence.  New research has found teenagers with incontinence are at greater risk of underachieving academically, and need more support to remove barriers so they can reach their academic potential. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in teens is around three to four percent and around one percent suffer from bowel incontinence. The research by academics at the University of Bristol, and published in the British Journal of Health Psychology, explored the impact of the secondary school environment on young people with incontinence and is the only detailed qualitative study carried out in this area in the UK. Read more.

Source: News-Medical.net, December 12, 2017

meeting conference

Report from NIA-Sponsored Conference Asks: What Don’t We Know About Bladder Control?

Nearly 40 percent of older women and up to 35 percent of older men live with distressing urinary symptoms, including difficulty with bladder control and urinating (sometimes known as “voiding”), which often compromise quality of life and overall health. The lack of truly effective and safe therapies for these challenges stems from insufficient knowledge of the biological mechanisms for urinary control, the impact of aging and disease on urinary control, and the relationships of symptoms to urinary health and overall well-being, so say researchers reporting on a prestigious conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and funded by a grant from the National Institute of Aging (NIA) to George A. Kuchel, MD, FRCP, AGSF, Director of the UConn Center on Aging and Travelers Chair in Geriatrics and Gerontology at UConn Health.  Read more. 

Source: Medical Xpress, December 4, 2017

Stockholm, Sweden

TENA Introduces New Breathable Tech to Premium Line

The TENA brand’s premium absorbent product portfolio, made by Essity (formerly SCA), features new enhancements to promote skin health. TENA Premium Briefs, Protective Underwear and Heavy Pad incontinence products will now feature TENA ConfioAir 100 percent breathable technology, which allows excess moisture to evaporate, to help maintain skin’s natural moisture balance and improve comfort for wearers.  TENA’s ConfioAir technology features a unique outer layer with micro-pores that allows moisture from the inner absorbent core to evaporate. This helps maintain skin’s natural moisture balance, allowing it to breathe and keeping the skin on the inside of the product comfortable and dry. This breakthrough technology is now included across TENA’s premium absorbent product line at no additional cost to the customer. Read more.

Source: HomeCare, November 30, 2017

surgeons perform pelvic organ prolapse surgery

Australia Bans Use of Vaginal Mesh Implants for Prolapse

An Australian watchdog has banned the use of controversial vaginal mesh implants for prolapse after a review found “the benefits do not outweigh the risks these products pose to patients”.  The Therapeutic Goods Administration has decided to remove the use of mesh products in the treatment of pelvic organ prolapse and single incision mini-slings which is used to treat urinary incontinence. This move follows the news that NICE, the health watchdog in the UK, will recommend that mesh should be banned as a routine treatment for prolapse, a condition when organs such as the vagina, uterus or bowel fall down or slip out of place. The draft guidance, seen by Sky News and due to be published next month, states that mesh implants for prolapse should now only be used for research purposes. It does not affect the use of mesh for incontinence which accounts for the majority of operations. Read more.

Source: Sky News, November 29, 2017

operating room

Vaginal Mesh Operations Should Be Banned, Says NICE

The health watchdog NICE is to recommend that vaginal mesh operations should be banned from treating organ prolapse in England, the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire show has learned.  Draft guidelines from NICE say the implants should only be used for research – and not routine operations.  Some implants can cut into the vagina and women have been left in permanent pain, unable to walk, work or have sex.  One expert said it is highly likely the NHS will take up the recommendation.  However, the organisation is not compelled to act on findings it receives from NICE.  Both NHS England and NICE declined to comment. Read more.

Source: BBC News, November 27, 2017